Street prostitution

Photo of the Day

The Police Commissioner Made A Deal With Leigh And Devine. In 1935, Police Commissioner McKay decided to speak with Devine and Leigh to get them to stop ordering attacks and cut the cocaine distribution. It was either they stop picking on each other and pedalling coke, or the entire police force would find a way to shut down every shady business they both had. So they agreed.

Tilly Devine ‘Queen of Woolloomooloo’

 and

Kate Leigh “Queen of the Underworld”

Brothel Madams to Crime Moguls: These Women Terrorised Sydney with Their Fierce Gang Rivalry. Dubbed the “Worst Woman in Sydney,” Tilly Devine was the Queen of the criminal underworld in Woolloomooloo in the 1920s. She spent years as a prostitute and ran a string of brothels, in addition to heading a razor blade gang.

Not far behind her in the criminal ranks, was rival razor gang leader and booze bootlegger Kate Leigh. Leigh was the Queen of Surry Hills, but she had her eye on becoming the crime lord of Sydney and would stop at nothing to dethrone Devine. In addition to terrorising Sydney, the two would have brawls in the streets and attack each other’s businesses.

Tilly Devine was born Matilda Twiss and began her career of prostitution as a teenager in England. She didn’t take on the name Tilly Devine until she met Jim Devine, an Australian serviceman, in 1917. She married him and followed him back to Australia in 1919, where she managed to accrue 79 convictions in just five years time. It wasn’t until 1925 that any of her arrests resulted in a serious penalty—she served two years jail time after slashing the face of a Sydney Corke with a razor blade.

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Streamlining cock tax, Uber style app launched for hookers

The Economist reports on the launch of a new app in Germany to streamline bookings and haggling of prices with hookers.

FOR those seeking commercial sex in Berlin, Peppr, a new app, makes life easy. Type in a location and up pops a list of the nearest prostitutes, along with pictures, prices and physical particulars. Results can be filtered, and users can arrange a session for a €5-10 ($6.50-13) booking fee. It plans to expand to more cities.

Peppr can operate openly since prostitution, and the advertising of prostitution, are both legal in Germany. But even where they are not, the internet is transforming the sex trade. Prostitutes and punters have always struggled to find each other, and to find out what they want to know before pairing off. Phone-box “tart cards” for blonde bombshells and leggy señoritas could only catch so many eyes. Customers knew little about the nature and quality of the services on offer. Personal recommendations, though helpful, were awkward to come by. Sex workers did not know what risks they were taking on with clients.

Now specialist websites and apps are allowing information to flow between buyer and seller, making it easier to strike mutually satisfactory deals. The sex trade is becoming easier to enter and safer to work in: prostitutes can warn each other about violent clients, and do background and health checks before taking a booking. Personal web pages allow them to advertise and arrange meetings online; their clients’ feedback on review sites helps others to proceed with confidence.

Even in places such as America, where prostitution and its facilitation are illegal everywhere except Nevada, the marketing and arrangement of commercial sex is moving online. To get round the laws, web servers are placed abroad; site-owners and users hide behind pseudonyms; and prominently placed legalese frames the purpose of sites as “entertainment” and their content as “fiction”.

The shift online is casting light on parts of the sex industry that have long lurked in the shadows. Streetwalkers have always attracted the lion’s share of attention from policymakers and researchers because they ply their trade in public places. They are more bothersome for everyone else—and, because they are the most vulnerable, more likely to come to the attention of the police and of social or health workers. But in many rich countries they are a minority of all sex workers; just 10-20% in America, estimates Ronald Weitzer, a sociologist at George Washington University.

This could easily solve Papatoetoe’s problem with street walkers.   Read more »

Council run brothels in Christchurch?

It appears Christchurch are going trial a 25 by 25 meter area for prostitutes to solicit for business.  Joelle Dally has more:

Christchurch city councillors Ali Jones and Pauline Cotter are spearheading the creation of a temporary site for street-based sex workers between Bealey Ave and Kilmore St.

Jones said the aim was to solve post-quake tensions between prostitutes and Manchester St residents north of Bealey Ave, and to make it safer for workers and their clients.

A preferred site had been identified out of five considered along that stretch of the street, she said.

Jones would not reveal the exact location as it was not yet confirmed, and consultation with the landowner, residents and businesses was still under way.

The temporary site would have facilities including toilets, lighting, security cameras and needle receptacles.

Why not a pie warmer with some sausage rolls and pizza slices, a douche dispenser and charging points for personal electronics?   Read more »

A working girl gets punched as she solicits on church grounds

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Brair Ensor reports

An experienced prostitute will not be on the street tonight because she fears for her safety after “disgusting and appalling” attacks on two sex workers.

Police are looking at the possibility the same person is responsible for the separate incidents in central Christchurch.

A prostitute was sexually assaulted on an empty section in Bealey Ave, between Manchester and Madras streets, about 3am yesterday.

Two hours later, another prostitute was punched in the grounds of the St Mary’s Pro-Cathedral, next to St Mary’s School.

Both attacks involved a Maori or Polynesian man.   Read more »

Juxtaposition of the Day

Via Stuff Mobile

Via Stuff Mobile

Juxtapositions are a whimsical way to remind us of the Law of Unintended Consequences.

Tweets you don’t really want to see

This will help Papatoetoe

The Germans are canny sometimes. Take this idea for raising public cash:

A “sex meter” scheme, taxing prostitutes €6 a night to work the streets of Bonn has raised more than €35,000 for public coffers in its first year, authorities said this week.

Prostitutes working the streets of Germany’s former capital have to buy themselves a ticket from the converted parking meters each night, or face a fine.

“The sex tax has been accepted by the prostitutes,” said city spokeswoman Elke Palm. The idea, introduced last August, was an extension of a tax imposed on brothels in the city at the beginning of 2011, Die Welt newspaper reported.

This would solve Papatoetoe’s problems with street walkers and also could possibly be used by Christchurch City Council for raising funds for the rebuild. Come to think of it Len Brown could do this to pay for his train set.