Te Tai Tokerau

“My people” and the politics of exclusion – Hide

Dusting off his megaphone, Hone Harawira echoed what has become commonplace for Maori MPs speaking of “Our People” as in, “the rights of Our People are important” and “We must always be guided by [creating a strong, Maori sovereign point of view within Parliament] because that’s what Our People want.”

When referring only to themselves, MPs employ the singular and speak of “My People”.

For example, when in hot water, Harawira declared, “I answer to My People, not to them or to anybody else.”

Bill English would be toast if he deployed the same affectation and spoke of “My People”. The reaction would be short and sharp. We would not tolerate it.

His colleagues would assume he had lost the plot and dump him.

English is prime minister, not some ancient king with royal rights over us.

And nor is Harawira. “His People” don’t belong to him.

Indeed, “His People” voted him out. And when he was an MP, the voters weren’t “His People” but rather he was privileged to be their representative. He was their servant, not the other way around.

Be that as it may, his people weren’t happy he had shacked up with a mischievous rich German who was trying to pretend he’d hang out with your average Maori from up north, because he understood their struggles against the government.  Hone’s mistake was that he laid bare his naked self-interest and it had nothing to do with “His people”.   Read more »

Call for Mr Harawira, it’s Darryl Kerrigan on line one

Hone Harawira is going to try a comeback in Te Tai Tokerau.

Former MP Hone Harawira is getting back into politics and will stand for Māori electorate seat Te Tai Tokerau again in next year’s election, he says.

Mr Harawira lost his seat to Labour’s Kelvin Davis in 2014. His Mana Party which combined with Kim Dotcom’s Internet Party, got just 1.5 percent of the party vote.

He told RNZ’s Mihingarangi Forbes on TV3’s The Hui he was re-entering the political fray because Māori lacked a strong voice in Parliament.

Mr Harawira said many Māori MPs got caught up in party politics, and forgot who they were meant to be representing.

“You’ve gotta have somebody in there who’s a fighter,” he said.   Read more »

Why does Kelvin Davis behave so cowardly toward his people?

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via ONE News

by Gavin

Having been silent and laying low over the real issue of Moko being beaten to death by his caregivers, he has found his voice again. Now the collective consciousness has moved on, up he pops with another prison crisis, this time it’s Corrections. This time, the dreadful crime of smokes being smuggled into prison by guards. Like that is anything new or newsworthy. Where does this guy get his life from?

Does he go to the cops with information for a prosecution? No he goes on TV and won’t reveal his sources, because, well you know none of these people in prisons would tell lies now, would they? Really Kelvin, is that the best you have to offer your people?

Wow, I’m so impressed. He only cares about his people once they committed the crimes, and then visits them in jail to get their stories to attempt to bash the government. He should hang his head in shame. My question to him is: Why don’t you give a toss about your people before they get to prison? Read more »

Message to Kelvin Davis: When you’re in a hole….

Kelvindavis

I knew Kelvin Davis wasn’t the sharpest tool in the shed, and he’s exceeded my expectations

A group of New Zealanders, including Labour MP Kelvin Davis, is touring Australia to protest the cancellations of Kiwi visas under that country’s tough immigration rules.

The Route 501 Hikoi, named after the section in the Migration Act, say they are visiting Australian cities to talk about the human rights issues surrounding the controversial clause. Read more »

Kelvin Davis doubles down against Crusher

Labour says the Corrections Minister Judith Collins needs to stop making excuses after she denied claims fight clubs at Mt Eden Prison began well before Serco took over.

The allegations were made in the High Court yesterday, where the private prison operator is trying to block the release of a report into last year’s fight club saga.

Labour’s Corrections spokesperson, Kelvin Davis, says Ms Collins is clutching its straws by saying the fight clubs in 2009 were at Mt Eden Prison, not the renovated Mount Eden Correctional Facility.

“If the behaviour was happening in the old prison, just moving them to a new prison isn’t going to change their behaviour.

“It’s like saying a classroom of children, if you move them from one classroom into a new classroom all of a sudden they’re going to be better and behave better and learn better,” he says.

Ms Collins says the claim was “false information”. Read more »

Winston and Kelvin Davis need to get their facts straight

Yesterday in parliament Winston Peters and Kelvin Davis led a shameless and more to the point dead wrong attack against a local company in Northland.

They are trying to link Judith Collins into the attack and Nick Smith didn’t really help her with his hesitant responses.

Kelvin Davis : Has he discussed the issue of swamp kauri exports with Judith Collins, whose husband, David Wong-Tung, and good friend Stone Shi are directors in the chain of shell companies that owns the Ruakākā mill, the ultimate ownership of which is obscured by a lawyer’s nominee company?

Mr SPEAKER : In so far as there may be some ministerial responsibility.

Hon Dr NICK SMITH : I thought that this member was above getting involved in that sort of murk.

Kelvin Davis : I raise a point of order, Mr Speaker. I did ask a question, and it was not addressed.

Mr SPEAKER : Yes, and I said that the Minister could answer it in so far as there was ministerial responsibility. There was very little connection there with ministerial responsibility. I allowed the Minister to answer it the way he did, and that is acceptable.

Rt Hon Winston Peters : Is he denying what is well known to locals in Northland: that swamp kauri is being exported illegally and that his ministry’s lax enforcement of the law is because people high up in Oravida are major donors and players in the National Party, and there are the photographs of the logs, all being exported illegally?

Mr SPEAKER : Again, I will invite the Minister to answer if he sees ministerial responsibility.

Hon Dr NICK SMITH : The law in respect of the export of indigenous forests was passed in 1993, with that member’s support. It was softened in 2004 by colleagues adjacent to him, with his support. My advice is that the law is being followed.

Rt Hon Winston Peters : I raise a point of order, Mr Speaker. He cannot get up and accuse me of supporting a law when I was not a member of the Government. He did it on both occasions—1993 and 1994. We all know that. He is just telling lies.

Mr SPEAKER : Order! [Interruption] No, I do not need further help with that. That is certainly not a point of order. I will invite the Minister, if he wishes, to add further to his answer in order to complete it before we go to further supplementary questions.

Hon Dr NICK SMITH : I would invite the member to check the Hansard as to how New Zealand First voted in 1993 on the Forests Amendment Act, and, again, as to how the party voted in 2004 when the law was changed.

They are running off their mouths under the protection of parliamentary privilege.    Read more »

Labour’s electoral self-interest bill defeated

Labour’s self-interest bill wanting to lower the threshold under MMP from 5% to 4% has been defeated. The same bill wanted to remove the coat-tailing provision as well in a shameless bid to spike National despite one of the MPs targeted under their bill having joined with Labour themselves, and David Cunliffe trying to use the same provision to cut a deal with Internet Mana at the last election.

Parliament has voted down a bid to close the loophole that allows MPs to enter Parliament on the coat tail of someone who wins an electorate seat.

A bill promoted by Labour MP Iain Lees-Galloway would have implemented the recommendations of the Electoral Commission following a review which called for the removal of the single electoral seat threshold and a corresponding reduction in the party vote threshold from 5 per cent to 4 per cent. Lowering the party vote threshold would make it easier for smaller parties to win seats in Parliament because they would only need to win 4 per cent of the vote, not 5 per cent, the current threshold.

Imagine if Colin Craig and his cultists had been elected…any government supported by him and his disciples would now be in dreadful trouble.

The coat tailing rule is seen as unfair because it means parties that win only a small number of votes can still get a number of MPs in Parliament so long as they win an electorate seat.  It also can allow larger parties to do deals that would help smaller parties into Parliament, which happened with ACT and National in the Epsom seat in Auckland. In 2008 ACT won just 3.6 per cent of the vote after then-leader Rodney Hide won Epsom, in contrast with NZ First which got voted out of Parliament with 4.1 per cent of the vote.   Read more »

Winston is not a details man

Winston Peters has launched his Northland by-election campaign by telling voters he’s offering them “a chance in a lifetime”.

The NZ First leader’s message at a street corner meeting was that if they back him he’ll be a strong advocate for a region that’s been neglected by successive governments.

“Northland ranks very high on social deprivation that that’s an absolute indictment of National’s woeful treatment of this region,” he told a street corner crowd in Wellsford today.

Mr Peters says that between now and March 28 he’ll cover the electorate from top to bottom in his “Force for the North” campaign bus.

The seat is vacant because National’s Mike Sabin resigned last month, citing personal reasons.

It’s been a safe National seat for decades but Mr Peters says he can win it by focusing on the way the region has been neglected.

And he’s targeting National voters by pointing out the government won’t change if he takes the seat, while the region will benefit from the strong message he’ll take to Wellington.
Mr Peters is up against candidates from National, Labour and ACT, as well as a handful of independents and four representing parties that aren’t in parliament.

He’s already up there with his big bus.  Just a small problem.   Read more »

Even Rudman understands why Labour shouldn’t run in Northland

It seems everyone except Andrew Little understands why Labour shouldn’t have run in Northland.

Brian Rudman lays off bludging for a new theatre to point this out.

On National Radio yesterday, Labour leader Andrew Little was talking up his candidate’s chances, and questioning Mr Peters’ electoral appeal. In his position, it was the only thing he could do. He said Ms Prime “has a profile and understanding you might not see sitting in Wellington or Auckland”.

Rather desperately he added that “Labour has always struggled to get good numbers there” but “circumstances may well have changed and [she] may well be in with a chance”.That seems highly unlikely. Since the seat was created in 1996 it has been solidly National. At last September’s general election, National’s Mike Sabin, whose sudden resignation for undisclosed personal reasons triggered the present contest, scored 18,269 votes to Ms Prime’s 8969. The party vote gap was even wider, National on 17,412, Labour, 5913. New Zealand First, with no candidate, was close to Labour on 4546.

Then there is the strategic implications of placating Winston and changing the dynamics of parliament.

He says Mr Peters endorsed Kelvin Davis, Labour’s winning candidate, in the Maori seat of Te Tai Tokerau last election and now Labour should return the favour. He reckons the New Zealand First leader, who has family connections in the North, is the only person who, “on a good day”, could win the safe seat off National and create all sorts of turmoil for the Government.   Read more »

Te Tai Tokerau won out West not in North

Hone Harawira sold out his principles and his party, and if that wasn’t enough he concentrated his campaign up north.

But new figures reveal that he should have looked to West Auckland to secure his votes.

Auckland voters played a big role in kicking Mana leader Hone Harawira out of Parliament, new statistics show.

The newly published Electoral Commission data revealed that Labour’s Kelvin Davis heavily defeated Mr Harawira in polling booths in Kelston, North Shore, Te Atatu and other Auckland spots.

In all, Mr Davis claimed 711 more votes than Mr Harawira in the Auckland polling booths, giving him a huge boost in the marginal seat.

His overall majority in the Te Tai Tokerau electorate was 743 votes.

Mr Harawira was not only beaten in Auckland but on his home turf in Northland.    Read more »