Teina Pora

Pressure builds for National to review their Pora compensation

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It could not be any clearer. Mr Pora spent 21 years in jail for a crime he did not commit. He has lived more than half his adult life behind bars.

He has been separated from his daughter, subjected to the harshness of imprisonment, defined by the justice system as a murderer and twice convicted of slaying a woman in a home he had not set foot in. In New Zealand judicial history, Mr Pora’s case ranks among the worst miscarriages of justice. On that ground alone, those with the task of reaching a fair and just settlement need to temper their accounting with compassion.

Yet despite months of freedom, and a report by a retired High Court judge which found unequivocably that a different man was solely responsible for the heinous rape and murder of Susan Burdett, Mr Pora finds himself still fighting the state to show an element of decency. Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

So Teina Pora gets $2m, but who leaked the info?

The day after cabinet makes a decision, and the day before the announcement from Justice Minister Amy Adams, the settlement figure for Teina Pora gets leaked.

Teina Pora is set to receive more than $2 million in compensation for wrongful conviction and imprisonment.

Justice Minister Amy Adams has called a press conference for tomorrow to make an announcement about the case.

While her office would not reveal any details, it is understood that the Cabinet has today approved compensation for Mr Pora.

The base rate for compensation in wrongful conviction cases is $100,000 a year.   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

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2015 – Our winners

TEINA PORA

He was already out of prison, but Pora wasn’t truly a free man until the Privy Council in March quashed his convictions for the 1992 rape and murder of Susan Burdett. No retrial was ordered, meaning Pora would not have to face the courts for a third time. His legal team launched a bid for compensation for wrongful conviction and imprisonment, which is still under consideration. But in his first television interview, Pora – who became a grandfather while behind bars – said the bid was less about the money and more about an apology: “I want an apology … Then I can move on.”

As we’ve seen, he’s after more than an apology now.  All the humility has gone, and he’s back to form.

LYDIA KO

Ko is probably one of the nicest people in world sport and 2015 has certainly been a massive year for the 18-year-old. She became the youngest ever world No.1 – man or woman – and clocked up 17 top-10 finishes, including five titles. She claimed her first major – the Evian Championship in France – and was named Player of the Year. Despite her success and sporting prowess, Ko made headlines in January for the unlikeliest of reasons – the fact she’d traded in her glasses for contacts.

THE TPP NEGOTIATORS

After plenty of false starts and ominous predictions it’d never get off the ground, the Trans-Pacific Partnership free trade deal was finally completed in October. The TPP had its beginnings way back in 2006 with the P4 agreement between Brunei, Chile, New Zealand and Singapore. It eventually morphed into a deal involving 12 countries and that’s where negotiations hit complications. In August, conflicts over car, pharmaceutical and dairy industries threatened to scuttle the TPP. But one final push in Atlanta, with several days of talks that went through the night, finally secured a deal.

Unlike the idiots in France talking about a planet warming up but agreeing to a non-binding agreement (huh?), the TPP actually required real hard work and compromise.

DAVID SEYMOUR

The rookie MP has managed to turn around the fortunes of the ACT Party, which not so long ago appeared to be fading into political oblivion. He was behind the so-called Rugby World Cup booze bill that ultimately succeeded, allowing pubs to open and serve bleary-eyed punters alcohol in the early hours for the duration of the tournament. He’s also pushed along the euthanasia debate by drafting a member’s bill to allow for assisted dying in certain, strictly defined circumstances. Something of an endearing figure, Seymour’s also provided one of the more memorable quotes of 2015: “the French love the coq”.

As even National supporters are starting to tire of National, but they would never vote for Labour, NZ First and ACT are set for a huge resurgence in 2017.  If Seymour and his invisible supporters keep this up, you may see a larger ACT party back in partliament.

THE BLACK CAPS

They may not have won the Cricket World Cup, but for a few all-too-brief weeks, it seemed even the most unlikely of cricket fans were converted. In the pool stages of the tournament, the Black Caps embarrassed both England and Australia. Then there was the unforgettable, nail-biting semi-final – Grant Elliot became an instant hero when he slammed a six into the stands at Eden Park on the second-to-last ball of the match, securing victory. Sure, they weren’t able to repeat the feat in the final against Australia, but the Black Caps at least proved some of their doubters wrong.

Being a Black Cap fan is like being in a bad relationship.  You keep going back for more, because when it’s good, it is really good.

 

– NZN, via Yahoo!

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

A group of failed cops and McCready wannabes plan to second-guess the police and the courts

Apparently our jails are full of innocent men.

So much so that a group of failed cops and McCready wannabes plan to second-guess the police and the courts.

A group of legal experts and private investigators are banding together to take up the cases of convicted criminals who may have been victims of a miscarriage of justice.

The move was sparked by Teina Pora’s recent successful Privy Council appeal.

Michael October served 11 years in jail for the 1994 rape and murder of Anne-Maree Ellens but he says he didn’t do it and there was no DNA evidence linking him to the scene.

“It’s the invisble anklet that no one sees that I’m on parole. I’ve been convicted and charged for murder and rape so, walking around with that, I know that I live with that. I’m just trying to make ends meet and get on with my life,” says Mr October.

Now known as Mikaere Okatopa, his case will be the first investigated by the New Zealand Public Interest Panel (NZPIP).    Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Judith Collins on Pora case

Judith Collins writes an Op-Ed piece for the Dompost about the media pressure coming on in favour of Teina Pora.

New Zealand has one of the best-performing justice systems in the world. It has minimal corruption, a strong judiciary and high public confidence in its institutions.

New Zealand consistently ranks at the top of Transparency International’s corruption perception index for having one of the least corrupt, most transparent governments.

The separation of powers – between the executive and the judiciary – is at the heart of democracy. It ensures that power does not concentrate in one branch of government.

Decisions about criminal responsibility are made by the courts.

Every convicted person can appeal against conviction and sentence. The appeal courts ensure the trial process was fair, evidence was properly admitted or excluded, and the verdict is not unreasonable.

The appeal courts, including the Privy Council, may quash a conviction, order a retrial or amend a sentence.  Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Herald and Gurnard stretching the truth

Oh what a surprise, in the continuing media campaign to free a twice convicted scumbag there is no level to which they won’t stoop. Take the Gurnard, who tweets:

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Are we handing over our justice system to activist journalists?

With the news this morning that Judith Collins is seeking advice into holding an inquiry into the case of twice convicted Teina Pora I have to wonder if we aren’t handing over our justice system to a bunch of crusading journalists hell bent on an “outcome”.

Justice Minister Judith Collins is seeking advice on whether to hold an independent inquiry into the Teina Pora case.

Pora was convicted in 1994 of the rape and murder of Susan Burdett in her home. He was convicted again in a retrial in 2000; however new expert evidence suggests he may have been convicted on a false confession.

An increasing number of experts and some former senior police believe he is innocent.  Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Police union kicks cops

The Police Association has decided to abandon all pretence of being apolitical.

In the last few months it has struggled to hide its left-wing affiliations, and its close work with Labour.

But the announcement that it wants an inquiry into the Teina Pora case, just a couple of days after Andrew Little did the same, speaks volumes.

In an unprecedented move, the Police Association is calling for an independent inquiry into the conviction of Teina Pora, who is now into his 21st year in prison for the rape and murder of Susan Burdett.

President Greg O’Connor told theWeekend Herald that the request was the first in the 16 years he has led the association, which represents rank-and-file police officers, but he believes it is justified on this occasion.

It should not be run by the police but could be a ministerial inquiry conducted by a Queen’s Counsel. “It’s a justice-sector issue. It’s not a police issue. The police can’t walk up to the prison and say, ‘Let him out’.”

Basically, Greg O’Connor is siding with Labour against his own members.  Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Shark jumping – 3rd Degree style

“The conviction by a jury, twice, of rapist and murderer Teina Pora is the biggest miscarriage of justice ever ever ever, says 3rd Degree and it is just not fair.

We have no new evidence, they say, but Teina is definitely innocent because he says he is.

Yes, we know our jails are full of people who did not commit their crimes, but Teina Pora really means it.

We will continue to lobby to have him freed, while focusing on parts of the evidence and leaving out other bits which, to be honest, don’t suit our narrative.   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Pretending to be grown ups

I’ve stayed way from 3rd Degree’s and TV 3’s campaign to free twice convicted rapist and murderer Teina Pora.

Basically, every single person in prison is innocent of all charges – or so they would have you believe.

But now, for some bizarre reason, the Daily Blog has tried to drag me into it as a way of having yet another go at the cops. I won’t link to it. It’s piss-poor as always. Dotcon’s biggest fan, David Fisher, has retweeted it, in line with the usual cop-bashing drivel.

But here’s the thing, if I was going to discuss it I’d talk about the facts.

They are:

The cops don’t actually convict people. Courts do that.

Teina Pora has been convicted twice by courts.

His lawyer has been asked to provide new evidence to back up his claims of wrongful conviction.

To date, he hasn’t done so.

A half-arsed media campaign counts for fuck all in the judicial system.

So there we go. A new TV programme backs a “cause” to get more viewers, get people talking about it, and get some cross-promotion from a sister news programme.

Pretty clever.

But then a few dumbos who should know better are reducing themselves to John Minto levels with schoolboy attacks on the cops.

Grow up and get real.

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.