The Huffington Post

Another example of a value system that doesn’t match ours

In my article on Sunday, I wrote about how Muslims are the group impacting the West most?because of their birth rates and because of their demands on our Christian and secular societies that reflect their different values. A Syrian refugee who writes for the Huffington Post is an excellent example of a Muslim who has a value system that is completely at odds with a society that defends women’s rights. ?18-year-old Aras Bacho tweeted that women should not be out alone at night. He also blamed women for the sex attacks across Germany last year on New Year’s eve.

…In a perhaps revealing statement about the attitudes of Syrian refugee men, Bacho ? who writes frequently for the Huffington Post?s German website ? said: ?Most of the time the women are to blame. To be alone at night. On the other hand, the refugees should behave?.

…His tweet, on his verified account, has been live for over 5 days at the time of publication, and the Huffington Post shows no signs of relieving him of his duties as a columnist, with his latest column being filed 5 days after the offending tweet.

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Is NBR the HuffPo of New Zealand?

A few years back I was asked by NBR if they could republish some of my content.

I said sure, $500 per post. For some strange and unknown reason I never heard back from them and they have never republished any of my posts.

However, they do republish posts from others, most notably David Farrar and Brian Edwards, and occasionally others. I am pretty certain that they don’t pay them as they would no doubt have been told that the only recompense was the kudos of having the NBR republish to their shrinking and small audience.

Turns out that is exactly the same business model that Huffington Post uses, making millions off of the back of free content.

I love this question,? said Stephen Hull, the editor-in-chief of Huffington Post UK, when Steve Hewlett asked him on Radio 4?s Media Show yesterday why he doesn?t pay his writers.

And this is the answer Hull apparently loves to give:

?If I was paying someone to write something because I want it to get advertising, that?s not a real authentic way of presenting copy. When somebody writes something for us, we know it?s real, we know they want to write it. It?s not been forced or paid for. I think that?s something to be proud of.?

Yes, a man who has literally made a career out of being paid to write and edit said this.

Your mole wonders how far the miserly head HuffPo honcho takes his logic. Presumably he can?t go out to eat at restaurants, because the food the (paid) chefs cook him is inauthentic. And when he?s ill, he must have to research his symptoms online instead of visiting a GP, because their salaries mean the diagnoses they give aren’t real. He must have to walk to work because of all those pesky salaried workers driving tube trains and buses, ruining the authenticity of the daily commute.

Maybe we?re being harsh on Hull, who doubtless draws no salary himself. Evidently he is just a lonely advocate for full communism who has accidentally found himself working for a global telecommunications behemoth. Poor man; poorer writers.

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Mark Steyn blasts media and many outlets cower in the face of terrorism

Mark Steyn wishes that the media would try at least to find their testicles.

http://youtu.be/WklsCGIfLdQ

The Sunday Star-Times gets a dishonourable mention in the segment.

We saw yesterday the cowardice of the NZ Herald in publishing only those Charlie Hebdo cartoons that offend politicians, Christians and Jews, but not a single one that might offend a muslim.

David Farrar found his courage though, which puts the New Zealand media to shame, and this same attitude seems to prevail worldwide where legacy media lack courage and new media exhibit it in spades.

With few exceptions, it has been digital outlets like The Huffington Post, The Daily Beast, Business Insider, BuzzFeed, Vox, and Slate that have exercised their constitutional right by republishing the cartoons that are thought to be the basis for the attacks. In contrast, many ?legacy? organizations, from CNN, to The Washington Post, to The New York Times, largely withheld the images. In explaining its decision not to distribute any of the images, the AP?s spokesman, Paul Colford, was quoted as saying, ?It?s been our policy for years that we refrain from moving deliberately provocative images.? Bloomberg, meanwhile, published a slideshow that included many of the incendiary covers.? Read more »

A day of infamy – Pearl Harbour Dec 7, 1941

On this day in 1941 the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbour and as a result dragged the United States into a global war.

The Huffington Post has a photo essay of that day.

It was a?sunny, mostly clear Sunday?in Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941, when the unexpected hum of planes cut through the warm Hawaiian air. In a period of just two hours, more 353 Japanese aircraft laid siege to the U.S. naval base, sinking 18 ships and destroying nearly 200 aircraft in a sneak attack that killed more than 2,400 Americans and wounded over 1,000 more.

In this U.S. Navy file photo, a small boat rescues a USS West Virginia crew member from the water after the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on Dec. 7, 1941 during World War II. Two men can be seen on the superstructure, upper center. The mast of the USS Tennessee is beyond the burning West Virginia. On Dec. 7, 1941, Japanese Imperial Navy navigator Takeshi Maeda guided his Kate bomber to Pearl Harbor and fired a torpedo that helped sink the USS West Virginia. President Barack Obama on Thursday Dec. 6, 2012 issued a proclamation declaring Dec. 7 a day of remembrance in honor of the 2,400 Americans who died at Pearl Harbor. He urged federal agencies, organizations and others to fly their flags at half-staff. (AP Photo, File)

In this U.S. Navy file photo, a small boat rescues a USS West Virginia crew member from the water after the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on Dec. 7, 1941 during World War II. Two men can be seen on the superstructure, upper center. The mast of the USS Tennessee is beyond the burning West Virginia. On Dec. 7, 1941, Japanese Imperial Navy navigator Takeshi Maeda guided his Kate bomber to Pearl Harbor and fired a torpedo that helped sink the USS West Virginia. President Barack Obama on Thursday Dec. 6, 2012 issued a proclamation declaring Dec. 7 a day of remembrance in honor of the 2,400 Americans who died at Pearl Harbor. He urged federal agencies, organizations and others to fly their flags at half-staff. (AP Photo, File)

 

The family that plays together stays together

Is this wrong?

A mother and daughter in Tampa, Fla., have a unique way of expressing family togetherness — by creating a pornography site and shooting sex scenes together.

The duo — known collectively as “The Sexxxtons” — like many porn performers, don’t give out their last names. Jessica, the mom, and Monica, the daughter, have been creating kinky content for their self-titled website for the past year and have just released a DVD.

In order to confirm the Sexxxtons are really related and not just claiming that as a marketing gimmick, The Huffington Post reviewed both women’s driver’s licenses, and their private Facebook pages, as well as private family photos going back 20 years.

Although mother and daughter have sex in the same room at the same time — often with the same male or female partner — they insist that their encounters are not incestuous. For legal and personal reasons, they don’t actually touch each other during sex scenes.

“We don’t have a problem doing two-on-one,” Jessica, 56, explained to The Huffington Post. “We will have sex with one man, but not interact with each other.”

Monica, 22, said the kinky choreography is a lot more difficult than her mom makes it sound.

“It’s not easy to do,” she told HuffPost. “Our lips never touch and that can be a problem when filming.”

Those precautions, the Sexxxtons said, are what keeps their scenes from legally being incestuous, even if experts like Beverly Hills-based psychiatrist?Dr. Carole Lieberman, who has never treated the Sexxxtons, considers their activities to be “emotional incest.”

“This crosses so many lines, it’s like a labyrinth,” Lieberman told HuffPost. “Even if they’re not having sex with each other, it has to be titillating to one or both or them, so it crosses the line since sexual arousal comes into the mix.”

Monica acknowledges the mother-daughter porn is enjoyable. “I enjoy the sex and I enjoy being with my mom,” she said. “During the scenes, I think about how we’re going to be filthy rich.”

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