Tom Cotton

Never mess with the NRA

NRA-Bumper-Sticker-2

The NRA is simply the best campaigning organisation in the world.

I joined the NRA for two reasons, first because they protect firearms owners, and secondly because I wanted to see how they campaign.

And when I say they are the best I mean it. They recently scored a more than 91% success rate in the mid-term elections in the US.

The biggest winner from the 2014-midterm elections is the NRA, which scored an astounding 91.2 percent win rate, according to the NRA.  Read more »

Did Martyn Martin Bradbury advise the Democrats?

Wrongly Wrongson, the blogger formerly known as Martyn Martin Bradbury, got all his predictions dead wrong in the last NZ general election.

But it seems he has taken his own particular brand of wrong punditry and been moonlighting with the Democrats in the US.

The Washington Examiner looks at some of the left wing shibboleths and Democratic myths that they clung to, which resulted in their defeat in the mid-term elections.

As Democratic losses mounted in Senate races across the country on election night, some liberal commentators clung to the idea that dissatisfied voters were sending a generally anti-incumbent message, and not specifically repudiating Democratic officeholders. But the facts of the election just don’t support that story.

Voters replaced Democratic senators with Republicans in Arkansas, Colorado, Iowa, North Carolina, Montana, South Dakota, West Virginia and likely in Alaska, and appear on track to do so in a runoff next month in Louisiana. At the same time, voters kept Republicans in GOP seats in heavily contested races in Georgia, Kansas and Kentucky. That is at least 10, and as many as a dozen, tough races, without a single Republican seat changing hands. Tuesday’s voting was a wave alright — a very anti-Democratic wave.

In addition to demolishing the claim of bipartisan anti-incumbent sentiment, voters also exposed as myths five other ideas dear to the hearts of Democrats in the last few months:

1) The election wouldn’t be a referendum on President Obama. “Barack Obama was on the ballot in 2012 and in 2008,” Democratic National Committee Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz said in late October. “The candidates that are on the ballot are Democratic and Republican candidates for Congress.” Of course, that was true, but Republicans from New Hampshire to Alaska worked tirelessly to put the president figuratively on the ballot. And they succeeded.

Every day on the stump, Republican candidates pressed the point that their Democratic opponents voted for the Obama agenda nearly all the time. “Kay Hagan has voted for President Obama’s failed partisan agenda 95 percent of the time,” said Thom Tillis, who defeated the incumbent Democrat in North Carolina. Mark Pryor “votes with Barack Obama 93 percent of the time,” said Tom Cotton, who defeated the incumbent Democrat in Arkansas. “Mark Udall has voted with [Obama] 99 percent of the time,” said Cory Gardner, who defeated the incumbent Democrat in Colorado.

On Election Day, nearly 60 percent of voters told exit pollsters they were dissatisfied or angry with the Obama administration. In retrospect, there was no more effective campaign strategy for Republicans running in 2014 than to tie an opponent to the president.

Whoopsy…got that dead wrong.  Read more »

So far so good for the GOP, plus 3 in the Senate

The Republican party already holds a large majority int eh house and in this midterm election was seeking to gain 6 seats to gain control of the Senate.

They are half way there as counting continues.

The Wall Street Journal reports:

Races that could determine Senate control remain too close to call as incumbent Democrats try to fend off GOP challengers in North Carolina and, in a surprise addition to the battleground field, Virginia.

But Republicans have now picked up three of the six net seats needed to seize control of the Senate, with wins in Arkansas, South Dakota and West Virginia.

Democrats, meanwhile, held the New Hampshire Senate seat, depriving the GOP of a prime pickup opportunity.

In Arkansas, Rep. Tom Cotton beat incumbent Sen. Mark Pryor, the first incumbent to face defeat. In West Virginia, Rep. Shelley Moore Capito captured a seat the GOP hadn’t held in seven decades, beating Democrat Natalie Tennant. And in South Dakota, former Gov. Mike Rounds won a three-way race against Democrat Rick Weiland and independent Larry Pressler, a former Republican senator.

Like other Democrats, Mr. Pryor was weighed down by an unpopular president. He was also hampered by the shifting political views of his state, which may have no Democrats elected to statewide office for the first time since Reconstruction.

The first endangered Democrat to survive is New Hampshire’s Jeanne Shaheen, who fended off a challenge from Republican Scott Brown , the former Massachusetts senator.

With stakes at an all-time high for both political parties, Democrats and Republicans make an effort to get voters to polls. RNC’s Sean Spicer and DNC’s Mo Elleithee join Tanya Rivero. Photo: Getty

The battle for the Senate also remains close in Georgia, where Democrat Michelle Nunn and Republican David Perdue are each trying to reach the 50% threshold to avoid a January runoff election.

The tightest contest in the country so far appears to be the Florida governor’s race, where former Gov. Charlie Crist and Republican Rick Scott are in a virtual tie with about a third of precincts reporting results, according to the Associated Press.

Read more »

GOP gets its funds cut for breaking the no dickhead rule

The donors aren’t happy with the shenanigans by the Republicans in Washington and are pulling the pin on their funding.

On a Monday last month, Rep. Greg Walden, chairman of the National Republican Congressional Committee, met with some top GOP donors for lunch at Le Cirque on Lexington Avenue in Manhattan. The donors, a youngish collection of financial industry types and lawyers, had some questions for Walden, a mild-mannered lawmaker from eastern Oregon known for speaking his mind.

Why, they asked, did the GOP seem so in the thrall of its most extremist wing? The donors, banker types who occupy the upper reaches of Wall Street’s towers, couldn’t understand why the Republican Party—their party—seemed close to threatening the nation with a government shutdown, never mind a default if the debt ceiling isn’t raised later this month.

That excuse isn’t going to wash with the money men, who think the GOP are being dickheads.  Read more »