Tom Scott

Political Cartoons are no laughing matter

Political cartoons are no laughing matter. Whaleoil has been taken to the Human Rights Commission in an attempt to silence us. People have decided that they are offended and they want to take away our freedom of speech. The people worldwide who condemned Charlie Hebdo for offending Muslims are no different to those who have taken Whaleoil to the Human Rights Commission. They think that their right to not be offended, trumps our right to publish a political cartoon. I have a little lesson for them from my days as a history teacher because I think that they fail to grasp the point of a political cartoon. Like a good blog, a political cartoon’s purpose is to stimulate debate, to make people think and to sometimes put the spotlight on issues we would prefer to ignore.

What is a Political Cartoon?

A political cartoon is a cartoon that makes a point about a political issue or current event.

Their main purpose, is not to amuse you but to persuade you.

A good political cartoon makes you think about current events, but it also tries to sway your opinion toward the cartoonist’s point of view. The best political cartoonist can change your mind on an issue without you even realizing how he or she did it.

Cartoonists’ Persuasive Techniques

Cartoonists use several methods, or techniques, to get their point across. Not every cartoon includes all of these techniques, but most political cartoons include at least a few. Some of the techniques cartoonists use the most are symbolism, exaggeration, labeling, analogy, and irony.

Once you learn to spot these techniques, you’ll be able to see the cartoonist’s point more clearly. You should also be aware of any political slant, or bias, that he or she might have. When you know where the cartoonist is coming from, it’s easier to make up your own mind.

-loc.gov

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If you agree with me that’s nice, but what I really want to achieve is to make you question the status quo, look between the lines and do your own research. Do not be a passive observer in this game we call life.

You can follow me on Gab.ai 

To read my previous articles click on my name in blue.

Just waiting for the howls of outrage over rape culture…waiting…waiting

tom-scott_homebrew

I am waiting to hear the howls of outrage from the left wing over lefty arts luvvie and crap music maker Tom Scott’s mad rant about John Key and discussing raping his daughter and son, on Red Radio.

Still waiting…waiting…sigh

But dare to mention a feral…cue nationwide outrage.

Rape culture from the left is but a trifling issue it hardly warrants a squeak.

The singer behind the controversial Kill the PM song swore and joked about raping John Key’s son before walking out of a live radio interview.

Former Home Brew singer Tom Scott was yesterday on Kim Hill’s Playing Favouritessegment of her Radio NZ show, where guests choose some of their favourite songs.

But things soured when Hill asked about the song Scott released with his band @peace during the election campaign, in which he sang about killing PM Key and having sex with his daughter, Stephanie.

Asked about the the lyrics, Scott said: “I mean obviously I regret what I said. I probably should have said I was going to rape his son.”   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

The Legend that is Tom Scott, and the absence of feared leaders

Alex Fensome had  chat with cartoonist Tom Scott

As a boy, Muldoon had been bullied by other children, and had learned to get his punch in first.

Scott found his depiction of Muldoon as a ridiculously short and fat man hilarious, but the prime minister was deeply wounded by it. It seemed to bring up many of the insecurities he hid so well.

For the rest of his parliamentary colleagues, though, even those in National, it was refreshing. “His colleagues would come up to me and say, ‘Tom, I loved the Muldoon cartoon, shove it up the little bastard’.”

About a year into his time at Parliament, Scott ran into the prime minister in the corridor. People think he made this story up, but he insists it is true.

Scott leans back in his chair and puts on the famous Muldoon accent. “Ah, Mr Scott, saw an article of yours in The Listener . . . didn’t know you could write.”

“I didn’t know you could read,” he replied.

Awesome.   Worthy of Churchill and Thatcher.   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Andrew Little the cartoon

I do enjoy a good political cartoon and our resident cartoonist SonovaMin  is fantastic. Usually his cartoons provide us with a refreshingly alternative view of the Political world to that portrayed by other cartoonists out there but recently I have noticed a common theme.

On one topic they all seem to agree…

Chicane - Southland Times 19 November 2014

Chicane – Southland Times 19 November 2014

littleA

Emmerson – NZ Herald 19 November 2014

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If you agree with me that’s nice, but what I really want to achieve is to make you question the status quo, look between the lines and do your own research. Do not be a passive observer in this game we call life.

You can follow me on Gab.ai 

To read my previous articles click on my name in blue.

Wonders will never cease, keyboard interviewer Drinnan actually made a good point

John Drinnan, usually renowned for interviewing his keyboard has actually made a good point in his column yesterday.

It has been intriguing to see the reasoned response of opinion-makers to the Kill the Prime Minister song, and compare it with the witch-hunt against John Tamihere, which led to the broadcaster being sacked from RadioLive.

In this latest case, there have been questions about taxpayer support for the band @Peace, though this was unreasonable since the NZ On Air support was for the band, not the song. There was some chiding over the sexual references to the Prime Minister’s daughter, Steffi Key, and the obligatory cries of FFS. But overall, it was a sane response.

This was in marked contrast to the media storm that blew up over Tamihere, with the left approaching advertisers to withdraw from RadioLive and attacking Tamihere, Willie Jackson and anyone who dared suggest there were freedom of speech issues involved.

That issue came down to whether Tamihere asked the wrong questions of an unnamed young girl who called in to his and Jackson’s radio show over the Roastbusters allegations. While this person – Amy – has disappeared from sight, it appears that she was actually known to the broadcasters.    Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

About political songs

Some wise advice from a music blogger at Fairfax…see MSM have blogs too.

Funny works, nasty backfires.

The band @Peace really screwed up. You only have to click on that Wiki link to see how they’re going to be remembered. They released a song threatening to kill John Key – and then went into a swift panic, explaining that it was really all about mobilising young voters. The rallying cry included reference to sleeping with Key’s daughter. It wasn’t (quite) a statement of rape – but it’s a blunt and nasty use of the term, it’s a leading statement – “one of these days I’m going to f*** your daughter”. It could be very easily construed as a threat, an act of violence.

Musicians and writers love to claim that freedom of speech is so important – the band’s frontman Tom Scott has asked us to respect his right to express his disappointment in the leader of the country.

But he’s only killed one thing here – the credibility of the left; this just makes it far too easy for the right and any right supporters to (further) paint the left as a bunch of crackpots – conspiracy theorists, loons.

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Nasty lefty band, takes state funding, writes song about killing John Key

The left wing have been at high dudgeon for the past two weeks, targeting advertisers, bullying people off Twitter, out of newspapers, and off radio and television.

They don’t believe in freedom of speech, they believe in bullying, intimidation and now death threats…and you’re are paying for it.

An Auckland hip-hop crew have released a song with lyrics that threaten to kill Prime Minister John Key and have sex with his daughter.

Kill The PM, by @peace, depicts a golfing, luxury car-driving Key, and says he should die – “ain’t doin’ nothin’ so I’m gonna kill the prime minister”.

It continues: “I been tryin’ to get a job but they got none/so I instead I got a sawnoff shotgun/and ‘pop’.”

The crew is fronted by Tom Scott, formerly of Homebrew, along with Lui Tuiasau, Christoph “El Truento” James and Hayden “Dick Dastardly” Dick.

In the leadup to the 2011 election, Homebrew released a track attacking tax cuts for the rich and a low minimum wage.  Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Norman & Campbell Live: a fracking disgrace

Looks like Russel Norman and Campbell Live won’t be much welcome in ‘Naki given last night’s politically inspired Campbell Live non-story about spoil from oil and gas being used by farms to even our pasture.  To be clear, this is like the stuff that comes out of a post-hole borer but when you are drilling down a long way, it comes in mountainous proportions

The Russel Norman/Campbell Live love in has seen Feds Taranaki boss, Harvey Leach, rip the Green’s a new one:

“[The Green Party] seem willing to throw decent hard working people under a bus to get a cheap headline.  It is nasty politics spun at its worst.”

Oh dear Russel, the cute cuddly Green’s are now being called the nasty party by farmers.  Even the left’s favourite cartoonist, Tom Scott, this morning drew Russel as the ‘Incredible Sulk’ given Scott knew Muldoon while the carpet bagger Norman only got here in the mid-1990’s.  Feds stick the knife into the Green Taleban about being economic terrorists:  Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Labour’s slow-mo leadership coup

Matthew Hooton writes at NBR about the very strange and slow-mo leadership coup:

Labour lacks anyone with genuine star quality but Mr Cunliffe is the closest.

The New Lynn MP is undoubtedly the activists’ favourite, particularly in Auckland, but Mr Shearer’s Ephialtian deputy, Grant Robertson, is backed by the unions, the party’s Wellington-based apparatchiks and the parliamentary wing.

Some question whether Mr Robertson, being gay, could ever be elected prime minister, but more relevant than his private life is his professional one.  He is a Wellington bureaucrat who moved from the UN to become deputy chief of staff in Ms Clark’s Beehive.  Despite his relatively young years, Mr Robertson represents Labour’s past not its future.

Labour’s members want Mr Cunliffe to have a crack.  As revealed in Mr Espiner’sListener article, he may be pompous and vain but he would take the fight to Mr Key.  On balance, he would be less risky for Labour than continuing with Mr Shearer.

It should be an easy decision.  Labour could bumble along for the next few months with a divisive leadership battle, slowly bleeding support.  Or it could just get on and cut Mr Shearer’s throat now.

David Farrar notes that it takes just 14 disaffected MPs to roll David Shearer now. In order for Shearer to cement his control on the leadership he needs to win 3 more votes in caucus than he won when he first became leader.

[C]ome February 2013, David Shearer needs to have at least 61% of caucus vote for him to remain leader – or a ballot is triggered.

The fact the unions have backed this, suggests that Cunliffe could win both the 40% members votes and the 20% union votes and be forced into the leadership no matter what the caucus votes.

Tom Scott delivers a cruel blow to Shearer’s prospects:

As for Robertson, he can now kiss his leadership prospects goodbye. He had his coup in train this week and bottled it at the last minute, calling off a key meeting at the last minute on Thursday.

As for Labour in general they are showing that they are essentially pathetic cowards, unable to mount a coup in a proper way, rather they prefer skulking in the formerly smoked-filled rooms with back office apparatchiks rorting the rules to give them control. What they have done though is doomed the caucus to an albatross system for leadership.

 

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

The more things change the more they stay the same

the tipline

A reader emailed this cartoon of Tom Scotts from 1992:

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.