Trapping

The outrage: man convicted for trapping cat on his own property

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supplied, via Stuff

A Palmerston North man convicted of capturing a pet cat in a leg trap said he was trying to prevent it from hunting birds on his property.

Paul Parsons was convicted in the Palmerston North District Court on Wednesday on a charge of using a prohibited trap for the purpose of capturing an animal.

He was fined $500 and ordered to pay $130 in court costs and a $250 contribution to legal costs.

A statement from the SPCA said that when Parson was interviewed he admitted setting the trap for the purpose of capturing the cat to prevent it from hunting birds on his property.

SPCA NZ chief executive Ric Odom said the actions were “clearly completely unacceptable and irresponsible”.

“The SPCA wants this conviction to send a clear message to anyone considering setting leg hold traps – and the message is: don’t do it. It is illegal to set leg hold traps near dwellings and size one-and-a-half long-spring leg hold traps are themselves illegal.”

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Conservation is all about killing things

The liberal elites think hunting is evil…because people like me kill things and eat them.

Despite these attitudes, they also agree with tonnes of 1080 being dumped into our forests, lakes and streams…in order to kill things. At least I am eating my kill.

The bottom line though is every=thing I shoot, kill, and eat is introduced and a pest…someone has to do it.

We all need to do our part.

New Yorker has an article about New Zealand and our desire to rid ourselves of these introduced pests.

In the days—perhaps weeks—it had spent in the trap, the stoat had lost most of its fur, so it looked as if it had been flayed. Its exposed skin was the deep, dull purple of a bruise, and it was coated in an oily sheen, like a sausage. Stoat traps are often baited with eggs, and this one contained an empty shell. Kevin Adshead, who had set the trap, poked at the stoat with a screwdriver. It writhed and squirmed, as if attempting to rise from the dead. Then it disgorged a column of maggots.

“Look at those teeth,” Adshead said, pointing with his screwdriver at the decomposing snout.

Adshead, who is sixty-four, lives about an hour north of Auckland. He and his wife, Gill, own a thirty-five-hundred-acre farm, where for many years they raised cows and sheep. About a decade ago, they decided they’d had enough of farming and left to do volunteer work in the Solomon Islands. When they returned, they began to look at the place differently. They noticed that many of the trees on the property, which should have been producing cascades of red flowers around Christmastime, instead were stripped bare. That was the work of brushtail possums. To save the trees, the Adsheads decided to eliminate the possums, a process that involved dosing them with cyanide.  Read more »