trust

Who do people trust?

The Edelman report into where people place their trust doesn’t really provide any surprises.  It simply confirms what we already know.   Read more »

Photo of the Day

Butterfield-e1444849098769 Honour Thy Father

A Father who Pushed too Far

Athlete son played and obeyed until he could take no more

 They seemed like the perfect team. Bill Butterfield was a former Texas high school football star, renowned for his speed and power. His son Lance, a gifted defensive back, was determined to follow in his footsteps. But in Lance’s senior year- his championship season- something went wrong. A story of youth and passion, obedience and trust, insanity and murder.

In the dead of the night, after everyone else in the house had gone to bed, he would pull out a small notebook that he kept hidden away in a table drawer. It was a journal he had started keeping, no more than fifteen pages, each page containing a sentence or two.

“I was harassed because I wasn’t someone else,” he wrote on one page, and then he stopped. “I stayed civilized under primitive conditions,” he wrote on another page, then stopped again.

He sat for hours, the only sound in the house coming from the ticking of a clock. Outside, his dog pressed his nose against the patio door, hoping to be let in. Finally, he began to write on a third page, pressing down so hard that his pen almost ripped through the paper.

I have to be able to express my hurt—my pain—my animosity toward you or I will die . . .

The football arched through the air, travelling in a tight spiral, and the 2,500 fans of the Richland High School Rebels rose from their seats with a startled roar. It was 1995, an autumn evening in suburban Fort Worth, and the quarterback for the Haltom Buffalos, Richland’s longtime rivals, had flung a pass toward an open receiver halfway down the field. But Richland’s free safety, senior Lance Butterfield, was already racing for the ball, his head held straight up, moving so smoothly that his shoulder pads hardly rattled. At the last second, just when the football seemed beyond him, he leapt, stretching his body and pulling the ball away from the baffled Haltom wide receiver, who had no idea that Lance was even nearby.

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Which is worse, Dirty Politics or Dirty Media?

Turns out the public knows precisely who are scum and who can be believed…and here’s a clue: it isn’t the media.

Trust and confidence in members of Parliament has increased, but in the public mind MPs are still second-to-bottom of a list of 10 types of jobs and organisations.

MPs rank slightly ahead of journalists, the least-trusted group, and behind local council members, lawyers and civil servants, who are all below the half-way mark in a survey of public trust and confidence.

At the other end of the scale – the occupational groups and organisations which inspire the greatest public trust and confidence – are the ambulance service, the Fire Service, doctors and nurses, the police and school teachers.

Heh even hookers are more trusted than journalists.  Read more »

Laila Harre doesn’t actually believe in her own party policies

…or she does, but she doesn’t have a clue what it all means.  (More likely)

wq

y65

Mega.

I still don’t believe that everything on Mega is inaccessible to the people who run Mega.   It may be safe from outsiders, but the fact that they hold all the software and it hasn’t been independently verified to be secure leaves the possibility open that Mega staff and owners could, conceivably access anything at all.

This would be a matter of trust, would it not?

So you need to look at the people behind Mega.  I wouldn’t be comfortable with it.

 

Trust your gut instinct

There is building evidence that you should trust your gut instinct with people.

When it comes to detecting lies, you should trust your instinct, research suggests.

We are better at identifying liars when we rely on initial responses rather than thinking about it, say psychologists.

Generally we are poor at spotting liars – managing only slightly better than flipping a coin.

But our success rate rises when we harness the unconscious mind, according to a report in Psychological Science.

“What interested us about the unconscious mind is that it just might really be the seat of where accurate lie detection lives,” said Dr Leanne ten Brinke of the University of California, Berkeley.

“So if our ability to detect lies is not conscious – we simply can’t do this when we’re thinking hard about it – then maybe it lives somewhere else, and so we thought one possible explanation was the unconscious mind.”

When trying to find out if someone is lying, most people rely on cues like someone averting their gaze or appearing nervous.  Read more »

Dodgy Scoop Media loses Labour and Cunliffe funder; now back in control of Dotcom fanboi

dddd

Sure Bryce.

Read on:

tmtm

Getting trust is easy.  Regaining trust once it is lost not so much.

After a dreadful run-up to what should have been a fantastic start of an election year for Scoop Media, with plans to expand, take on the main news channels, and drive a stake into their online corpses, it turns out the numbers just didn’t stack up.

Statement From Scoop Media Limited Publisher Alastair Thompson

Scoop Media Ltd. regrets that an investment from Sublime Group in Scoop Media Limited will not proceed at this time.

On Monday 24 February operational control of Scoop Independent News returned to the Scoop Media Limited shareholders.

The team running Scoop has now returned to normal, Scoop Co-Founder Alastair Thompson has returned to Scoop as Publisher and Editor, Gordon Campbell continues on as Political Editor & Werewolf Editor and Lyndon Hood remains News Editor.

Scoop co-founder Alastair Thompson said today:   Read more »

National’s most un-trustworthy person — Part 5

This blog con­tin­ues to take a close look at trust­wor­thi­ness in the National Party over the next few weeks.

This is because this blog has dis­cov­ered and learned of some dis­turb­ing acts of untrust­wor­thi­ness inside National over the last 6 months.

In fact, from what I have gath­ered over this time, it may well be some of the most untrust­wor­thy behav­iour seen in the National Party for the bet­ter part of 25 years.

What do I mean by untrustworthy?

Well, per­haps a score might be use­ful to help show the grav­ity of the situation.

I have come up with the “Wha­le­oil Un-Trustworthiness Scale” to help read­ers under­stand, with 1 being com­pletely trust­wor­thy, and 10 being despi­ca­bly untrustworthy.

A score of 1 would of course be some­one like John Key. Vot­ers trust John Key. He has com­pro­mised the speed of some reforms in order to not break promises, such is the value of trust to him. Sure he has reneged on no increase to GST but that is small beer com­paed with Mr or Mrs Infin­ity and their treachery.

Next to John Key as a one on the trust­wor­thy scale is board mem­ber, Can­ter­bury West­land Regional Chair and old fash­ioned gen­tle­man, Roger Bridge.

Thirty six years of loyal ser­vice to the party help, but oth­ers have been in the party as long as Roger. What sets Roger apart is he has always a kindly word for every­one in the party, and has the cour­tesy to treat all with dig­nity and has prob­a­bly bought them a drink or two as well. More likely more than a drink or two as Roger is a free spender when entertaining.

The only peo­ple that don’t like Roger are the bug­gers mud­dle and that just rein­forces his most trust­wor­thy status.

Tim Groser would have to be a score of 2. You would be a lit­tle ner­vous about loose lips if he was in Air NZ first class, armed with a bot­tle of cham­pagne and a beau­ti­ful woman hang­ing off his every word, but by and large, Groser is a very trust­wor­thy man.

Melissa Lee would be a three. She’s a very nice and bright per­son, but her polit­i­cal skills mean you wouldn’t trust her in a cam­paign. Sadly, she is a bit like  Mal­colm Tucker’s cof­fee machinewhen it comes to elec­tions — from bean to cup, she fucks up.

Let’s leap ahead to what a number 7 or number 8 on the scale of un-trustworthiness would look like.

Kanwal Bakshi would be a seven. Don’t sell him a restaurant or ask him to deal in any immigration matters.

Murray McCully is devious, shrewd and often vindictive. He’s an eight. But I will say this about McCully, devious though he may be, he does have the interests of the National Party at heart.

So who then, would be a ten?

Who would be Mr or Mrs Infin­ity? Far exceed­ing even a despi­ca­ble ten.

Would it be the sort of per­son who abuses the office they hold within the party?

More to come.…

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National's most un-trustworthy person – Part 4

This blog continues to take a close look at trustworthiness in the National Party over the next few weeks.

This is because this blog has discovered and learned of some disturbing acts of untrustworthiness inside National over the last 6 months.

In fact, from what I have gathered over this time, it may well be some of the most untrustworthy behaviour seen in the National Party for the better part of 25 years.

What do I mean by untrustworthy?

Well, perhaps a score might be useful to help show the gravity of the situation.

I have come up with the “Whaleoil Un-Trustworthiness Scale” to help readers understand, with 1 being completely trustworthy, and 10 being despicably untrustworthy.

A score of 1 would of course be someone like John Key. Voters trust John Key. He has compromised the speed of some reforms in order to not break promises, such is the value of trust to him. Sure he has reneged on no increase to GST but that is small beer compaed with Mr or Mrs Infinity and their treachery.

Next to John Key as a one on the trustworthy scale is board member, Canterbury Westland Regional Chair and old fashioned gentleman, Roger Bridge.

Thirty six years of loyal service to the party help, but others have been in the party as long as Roger. What sets Roger apart is he has always a kindly word for everyone in the party, and has the courtesy to treat all with dignity and has probably bought them a drink or two as well. More likely more than a drink or two as Roger is a free spender when entertaining.

The only people that don’t like Roger are the buggers muddle and that just reinforces his most trustworthy status.

Tim Groser would have to be a score of 2. You would be a little nervous about loose lips if he was in Air NZ first class, armed with a bottle of champagne and a beautiful woman hanging off his every word, but by and large, Groser is a very trustworthy man.

Melissa Lee would be a three. She’s a very nice and bright person, but her political skills mean you wouldn’t trust her in a campaign. Sadly, she is a bit like Malcolm Tucker’s coffee machine when it comes to elections – from bean to cup, she fucks up.

So who then, would be a ten?

Who would be Mr or Mrs Infinity? Far exceeding even a despicable ten.

Would it be the sort of person who abuses the office they hold within the party?

More to come….

 

National's most un-trustworthy person – Part 3

This blog continues to take a close look at trustworthiness in the National Party over the next few weeks.

This is because this blog has discovered and learned of some disturbing acts of untrustworthiness inside National over the last 6 months.

In fact, from what I have gathered over this time, it may well be some of the most untrustworthy behaviour seen in the National Party for the better part of 25 years.

What do I mean by untrustworthy?

Well, perhaps a score might be useful to help show the gravity of the situation.

I have come up with the “Whaleoil Un-Trustworthiness Scale” to help readers understand, with 1 being completely trustworthy, and 10 being despicably untrustworthy.

A score of 1 would of course be someone like John Key. Voters trust John Key. He has compromised the speed of some reforms in order to not break promises, such is the value of trust to him. Sure he has reneged on no increase to GST but that is small beer compaed with Mr or Mrs Infinity and their treachery.

Next to John Key as a one on the trustworthy scale is board member, Canterbury Westland Regional Chair and old fashioned gentleman, Roger Bridge.

Thirty six years of loyal service to the party help, but others have been in the party as long as Roger. What sets Roger apart is he has always a kindly word for everyone in the party, and has the courtesy to treat all with dignity and has probably bought them a drink or two as well. More likely more than a drink or two as Roger is a free spender when entertaining.

The only people that don’t like Roger are the buggers muddle and that just reinforces his most trustworthy status.

Tim Groser would have to be a score of 2. You would be a little nervous about loose lips if he was in Air NZ first class, armed with a bottle of champagne and a beautiful woman hanging off his every word, but by and large, Groser is a very trustworthy man.

So who then, would be a ten?

Who would be Mr or Mrs Infinity? Far exceeding even a despicable ten.

Would it be the sort of person who abuses the office they hold within the party?

More to come….

 

National's most un-trustworthy person – Part 2

This blog continues to take a close look at trustworthiness in the National Party over the next few weeks.

This is because this blog has discovered and learned of some disturbing acts of untrustworthiness inside National over the last 6 months.

In fact, from what I have gathered over this time, it may well be some of the most untrustworthy behaviour seen in the National Party for the better part of 25 years.

What do I mean by untrustworthy?

Well, perhaps a score might be useful to help show the gravity of the situation.

I have come up with the “Whaleoil Un-Trustworthiness Scale” to help readers understand, with 1 being completely trustworthy, and 10 being despicably untrustworthy.

A score of 1 would be someone like John Key. Voters trust John Key. He has compromised the speed of some reforms in order to not break promises, such is the value of trust to him.

Next to John Key as a one on the trustworthy scale is board member, Canterbury Westland Regional Chair and old fashioned gentleman, Roger Bridge.

Thirty six years of loyal service to the party help, but others have been in the party as long as Roger. What sets Roger apart is he has always a kindly word for everyone in the party, and has the courtesy to treat all with dignity and has probably bought them a drink or two as well. More likely more than a drink or two as Roger is a free spender when entertaining.

The only people that don’t like Roger are the buggers muddle and that just reinforces his most trustworthy status.

So who then, would be a ten?

Who would be Mr or Mrs Infinity? Far exceeding even a despicable ten.

Would it be the sort of person who abuses the office they hold within the party?

More to come….

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