Underwater Ballroom

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To get to the underwater ballroom, the guests had to walk down a damp corridor of stairs and get into a 400-foot long subway that led them to a 30-foot high glass chamber. The ballroom had an ornate tile floor, extravagant furniture, and the effect of the underwater view was not lost on most guests. When light shone through the merky green water it was a spectacular sight; guests also enjoyed watching the fish scurry by the glass pane windows. However, if one of those windows broke, it would be just five minutes before the entire dome filled with water.

To get to the underwater ballroom, the guests had to walk down a damp corridor of stairs and get into a 400-foot long subway that led them to a 30-foot high glass chamber. The ballroom had an ornate tile floor, extravagant furniture, and the effect of the underwater view was not lost on most guests. When light shone through the merky green water it was a spectacular sight; guests also enjoyed watching the fish scurry by the glass pane windows. However, if one of those windows broke, it would be just five minutes before the entire dome filled with water.

The Swindler, The Cyanide Pill and The Underwater Ballroom

The Story Behind Britain’s Most Bizarre Folly

Upon first glance, Britain’s Witley Park in Surrey is just like any other extravagant mansion, but there’s much more to this Victorian masterpiece than meets the eye. From the secret underwater ballroom to dramatic suicide deaths, the story behind the man who built the mansion is surprisingly tragic.

The story of the underwater conservatory at Witley Park begins with James Whitaker Wright (1846-1904). Wright was a former printer, Methodist minister, and a company promoter and swindler.

Wright?s family immigrated to Toronto, Canada after his father died in 1870. From there Whitaker found his way to Philadelphia, where he found a lucrative career promoting silver mines.

However in Wright deals, only the promoters appeared to be making money. Mines in Leadville, Colorado and Lake Valley, New Mexico failed to yield the promised dividends or returns to investors.

For Wright the short-term success yielded short-term pleasure. With the great gains came great losses; he was left penniless after his interest in Gunnison Iron & Coal collapsed in 1889.

Whitaker was undeterred, as performance of his American investments were simply a means to an end. His greatest desire was to make a name for himself in the vaunted English Victorian Society.

He returned to England in 1889 and continued the schemes of promoting mines, this time on the London market. To this end he formed the London and Globe Company in 1890, to float stock and bond issues for his mines in Australia and Canada. Also propped up by Wright were the British and American Corporation and the Standard Exploration Company.

Whitaker might have lacked a moral compass, but he was a consummate salesman. In 1896 he raised ?250,000 ($373k) ? or about ?24.8M ($36.98M) in 2015 ? to purchase shares of a company established to dig mines in Western Australia. Investors were lured by Wright?s sly use of the word ?consol? in the name of the opportunity, thus creating the impression of a reliable investment.

[ Consol: British government security without a maturity date. The name is a shortened version of ?consolidated annuities.? This form of stock originated in 1751 and was generally considered to be one of the safer investments at the time. ]

Whitaker Wright?s deception would not go unpunished. But before he would face judgement, he created Witley Park.

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