United States Geological Survey

Peak Oil? How come they keep finding more then?

We’ve all heard about peak oil…and it never seems to arrive. It is another lie pushed by the hippy brigade.

Breitbart reports on the  latest find:

A western Texas oil and natural gas shale formation was labeled the “largest” of its kind by the U.S. Geological Survey on Tuesday.

Federal surveyors announced that the Wolfcamp shale in the Midland Basin portion of Texas’ Permian Basin now holds the record for most oil, natural gas, and gas liquid deposits that are “undiscovered, technically recoverable resources.”

The USGS notes that within its survey spanning from north of Lubbock to remote regions southwest of San Angelo, an estimated and previously unaccounted for 20 billion barrels of crude oil; 16 trillion cubic feet of natural gas; and 1.6 billion barrels of natural gas liquids are able to be extracted by means typically involving slant drilling and hydraulic fracturing, commonly known as “fracking”. The figures are based on official methods that project untapped resources amid formations already surveyed and exploited.   Read more »

Photo of the Day

Spruce Tree Snapped Off by the Wave - Seven Miles from its Source. Stump of living spruce tree broken off by the giant wave at Harbor Point, mouth of Lituya Bay. Brim of hat is 12 inches in diameter. This tree is located about seven miles (11.3 kilometers) from where the wave originated. Photo by D.J. Miller, United States Geological Survey.

Spruce Tree Snapped Off by the Wave – Seven Miles from its Source. Stump of living spruce tree broken off by the giant wave at Harbor Point, mouth of Lituya Bay. Brim of hat is 12 inches in diameter. This tree is located about seven miles (11.3 kilometers) from where the wave originated. Photo by D.J. Miller, United States Geological Survey.

World’s Tallest Tsunami

The Empire State Building is 448 metres high (1,470 ft), if you include the antenna spire. Now, imagine a wave that goes up to the 1,720ft (520 metres) and simply destroys all the trees high up in Lituya Bay, a fjord located on the coast of Alaska

Ketchikan, Alaska – Alaska is a land of geological superlatives: Big Mountains, vast spaces, huge earthquakes. So it would stand to reason that an event that happened 58 years is also the largest of its kind ever recorded.

The biggest tsunami in present times struck at Lituya Bay, Alaska on July 9, 1958. This was so big that it is known scientifically as a Mega Tsunami.

The wave was brought on by an enormous 8.3. Some say 8.8. And others say a 9.0 magnitude earthquake that hit the Fairweather Fault and caused a massive earth landslide.

The region had suffered earthquakes previously as it lies on a fault line; however, this was the most dramatic. The tremors were even felt by people in Seattle, Washington.

The earthquake that may have been as powerful as the one that helped destroy San Francisco in 1906. About 40 million cubic yards of rock — some of it falling from a height of 3,000 feet — plunged down the face of Lituya Glacier into Gilbert Inlet at the northern end of the bay.

Sudden water displacement created a wave that shot seaward from the land, and that was certainly a factor in what followed. But similar occurrences in Norway, where fjords are plentiful, never produced a wave remotely close to the size of this one.

The Lituya Bay mega tsunami was a freak tsunami (said to be the biggest wave ever) in Lituya Bay a large fjord in Alaska. The reason that this tsunami is so different to others is the fact that it ran from the land out to the ocean and was a lot taller than a regular tsunami.

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Tsunami warning issued for East Cape, Chatham Islands, Coromandel, and Banks Peninsula.

MCDEM-Tsunami

From the The Ministry of Civil Defence Emergency Management:

The Ministry of Civil Defence Emergency Management (MCDEM) has issued a tsunami warning (marine and beach threat) for East Cape, Chatham Islands, Coromandel, and Banks Peninsula.

People in the above coastal areas should: 1. Stay out of the water (sea, rivers and estuaries, including boating activities) 2. Stay off beaches and shore areas 3. Do not go sightseeing 4. Share this information with family, neighbours and friends 5. Listen to the radio and/or TV for updates 6. Follow instructions of local civil defence authorities The tsunami warning will remain in effect until a cancellation message is issued by MCDEM. Updates will be issued hourly. Only messages issued by MCDEM represent the official warning status for New Zealand, not those issued by the Pacific Tsunami Warning Centre (PTWC). This warning has been issued to all local civil defence authorities, emergency services, other agencies and media. Local civil defence authorities will interpret this information for their areas and advise public action via local radio stations.

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