Welfare dependency

UK Cutting Benefits to Bludgers who won’t work

Welfare is a safety net, not a lifestyle choice. Ninety years of welfare has created intergenerational welfare dependency, and instead of accepting this, the Pommy Tory Party have been aggressively chasing people off welfare. They started by limiting the benefits any family can receive to twenty six thousand quid, which drove people to work. Previous some families were receiving double this, maying work very unattractive.

Now Iain Duncan Smith has started nailing bludgers who aren?t looking for work.

More than 466,000 people have their benefits suspended including 2,000 who are barred from claiming for three years

Nearly half a million people have had their benefits suspended over the past year after they failed to do enough to find work, turned down job offers or missed Jobcentre appointments, according to new figures.

A total of 466,000 people were hit by sanctions which saw them barred from claiming Job Seekers Allowance for an average of between four weeks and three months.

However, 2,000 repeat offenders were hit by significantly harder sanctions and had their benefits stopped for the next three years, including 49 single parents and 978 people under the age of 24.

Iain Duncan Smith, the work and pensions secretary, hailed the figures as evidence that the sanctions system is deterring people from offending after the proportion of people sanctioned fell by 18 per cent.

He said that “there should be consequences” when people “don’t play by the rules”: “The vast majority of people on benefits want to work ? and take up all the support on offer to move into a job. We can see this from the record numbers of people in work and falling unemployment. ? Read more »

More good news, less people on benefits and more jobs available

You could say the good news just keeps on truckin’ on:

The labour market is taking off, with more jobs advertised in March, continuing a run of rises for three months in a row, a bank survey shows.

A strong economy is now being accompanied by rising employment, that will provide a backbone to household income growth over the months ahead.

The latest ANZ job ads survey points to unemployment falling from 6 per cent at the end of last year to 5.7 per cent at the end of March and dropping even more in coming months.

The number of job advertisements lifted 1.1 per cent in March, seasonally adjusted.

“This bodes well for an ongoing downward trend in the unemployment rate.” ANZ said.

Job advertising on the internet in March rose 2 per cent but fell 4.6 per cent in newspapers.

In the three months to March the level of internet job advertising lifted 6.4 per cent compared with the previous the three months, to be 15.3 per cent higher than a year ago.? Read more »

Welfare reform: A radical solution

Continuing on with Peter Cove’s article about what he learned in the Poverty War, he proposes a radical solution for welfare reform:

My experience with long-term welfare clients has led me to propose a radical solution: that we abolish?all?cash welfare, as well as food and housing assistance?except for the elderly and the physically and mentally disabled?in order to move from a dependency culture to one of work-first. This recommendation may sound impractical at a time of high unemployment. But the work-first principle can easily be implemented even in a down economy, as America Works proved by getting jobs for more than 500 ex-convicts in Detroit?a local economy with 14 percent unemployment?in the past two years. After all, despite the economic downturn, more than 3 million jobs per year go unfilled in the United States.

If it works for ex-convicts then why can’t it work for others?

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Work, not welfare, uplifts the poor.

Continuing examples of lessons from the poverty wars by Peter Cove. His contention is that work, not welfare lift the poor…which was precisely what I was talking about with a couple of left-wingers at the pub on Friday evening.

I?ve become fed up with the useless policies that I once supported, and I?m trying to change the strategy of our bogged-down army.

We know for certain that income transfers, the preferred tactic of generations of liberals, have utterly failed to end poverty. My firsthand experience with welfare clients has shown me why: being on the dole encourages dependency. Working at a real job, by contrast, is the surest way for a person to climb out of poverty. Accordingly, the surest way for the government to fight poverty is to eliminate cash assistance almost entirely and offer jobs instead.

Fortunately the left-wingers at the table all agreed with that sentiment, unfortunately others still prefer the destruction of welfare.

Welfare isn’t working…if it did we would have solved the issue of poverty long ago. Getting people into work is what is needs…and almost any job is good enough.

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