Wellington Chamber of Commerce

Gutless Wellington Chamber give up legal action against Council

The Wellington Chamber of Commerce have shown abject cowardice in withdrawing legal action against the Wellington City Council.

Wellington Chamber of Commerce has backtracked on threats to take Wellington City Council to court over its living wage policy.

The council, which has been paying its own staff a living wage since 2013, voted in October to require its security services contractors do the same.

The chamber announced it was concerned about the ability of the council to do that under the Local Government Act and sought a judicial review of the council’s living wage policy.

In a joint statement issued on Wednesday, both parties said legal proceedings had been halted and they were working towards finding a way to pay contractors the living wage that was acceptable to the council and the chamber.   Read more »

Wellington Chamber of Commerce to seek judicial review of Council decision over living wage

Very pleased to see that the Wellington Chamber of Commerce is seeking a judicial review of the council’s dopey living wage rules.

It’s about time that dud councillors were held personally responsible for their dopey decisions.

Wellington City Council’s decision to pay its security contractors a living wage is headed to the High Court, and ratepayers could end up paying some of the legal bills.

The Wellington Chamber of Commerce announced on Friday that it would seek a judicial review of the council’s living wage policy.

The council, which has been paying its own staff a living wage since 2013, voted 9-6 in October to require its security services contractors do the same.

The living wage is the hourly rate a worker needs to participate as an active citizen in the community. That amount is currently $19.25 per hour but the council’s interpretation is $18.55.

Bumping up the wages of all security guards, noise control officers and cash collection staff was estimated to cost the council an extra $1.7 million on top of the price of the seven-year contract.    Read more »