Wellington Phoenix FC

Why can’t Labour do this to Trademe Trev?

The Wellington Phoenix have shown somewhat more balls than Labour’s invisible leadership:

The person engaged to do live match updates on the Wellington Phoenix’s Twitter account has been red-carded by club officials after some distasteful tweeting during Sunday’s A-League victory over Gold Coast United.

Some tweets, best described as edgy, pushed the boundaries for a club’s official account, but others stepped over the mark with sexual references that several followers regarded as highly inappropriate.

One post in particular, involving a save by goalkeeper Mark Paston, had a strong sexual theme while others were in bad taste.

“Pav was sent through by Ifill – he had a couple of bites of the cherry like he was at a prom. It fell to Ward who eventually scored.”

“Lia is filling his boots at LB [left back]. Meanwhile, Lochead (sic) is filling his pants at home.”

Tony Lochhead missed the game through illness.

Among those offended were former Phoenix chief executive Tony Pignata, who tweeted: “Phoenix Twitter person makes the club look very amateur. Bad, bad look … no need for that type of humour.”

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Pffft, he threatens to sue everyone

Terry Serepisos threatens everyone, so no surprise he threatened the Football Federation of Australia with legal action:

He publicly relinquished control of the Wellington Phoenix with dignity but, behind the scenes, Terry Serepisos threatened Football Federation Australia with legal action after it told him his licence would be revoked.

Revelations that the bankrupted property developer did not relinquish the Phoenix without a fight come after the High Court yesterday approved the partial release of an affidavit in which he outlined the collapse of his empire.

It was Mr Serepisos’ parlous financial state – he was declared bankrupt three days after losing the Phoenix – that contributed to the FFA stripping him of the licence to operate the club.

Mr Serepisos was notified by FFA boss Lyall Gorman, either late on Thursday night or early Friday morning, just over a week ago, that his A-League licence would be withdrawn.

A new licence was issued to a consortium of seven Wellington businessmen for the club to play in the A-League for the next five years.

It is understood Mr Serepisos threatened the FFA with legal action after losing the Phoenix, a threat that was still hanging in the air until shortly before a press conference organised for noon on Friday last week.

Mr Gorman briefed Wellington City Council about the change in ownership less than three hours before the press conference was to begin.

It is understood that he told the council about the threatened legal action and that he was unsure how Mr Serepisos would publicly respond to losing the Phoenix.

However, he was optimistic that Mr Serepisos would bow out “gracefully”.

Unsurprisingly the threat of legal action turned out to be as serious as his loan from Honkers and the one from Western Gulf Advisory. I’m still waiting for the writ for his threats to sue me.

Full of piss and wind is our Terry.

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.