West Antarctica

Whoopsy, not global warming, instead it is volcanoes warming glaciers in Antarctica

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The green apologists and alarmists all got it wrong again when it was breathlessly reported that we had reached the tipping point and warming was causing some glaciers in Antartica to melt that was going to inundate us all…in several hundre years time.

All good news fodder except they got it wrong again…it is volcanoes that are doing the melting not global warming.

A?new study?by researchers at the University of Texas, Austin found that the West Antarctic Ice Sheet is collapsing due to geothermal heat, not man-made global warming.

Researchers from the UTA?s Institute for Geophysics found that the Thwaites Glacier in western Antarctica is being eroded by the ocean as well as geothermal heat from magma and subaerial volcanoes. Thwaites is considered a key glacier for understanding future sea level rise.

UTA researchers used radar techniques to map water flows under ice sheets and estimate the rate of ice melt in the glacier. As it turns out, geothermal heat from magma and volcanoes under the glacier is much hotter and covers a much wider area than was previously thought. Read more »

Oh so it wasn’t global warming melting the ice after all

While Chris Turney and his Ship of Fools was watching up close just how much ice there really is in Antarctica in the few moment they looked up from the prediction charts that said it wasn’t there, they were also telling us that the ice was melting because of global warming.

Except it wasn’t and isn’t.

Scientists at the British Antarctic Survey say that the melting of the Pine Island Glacier ice shelf in Antarctica has suddenly slowed right down in the last few years, confirming earlier research which suggested that the shelf’s melt does not result from human-driven global warming.

The Pine Island Glacier in West Antarctica and its associated sea ice shelf is closely watched: this is because unlike most of the sea ice around the austral continent, its melt rate has seemed to be accelerating quickly since scientists first began seriously studying it in the 1990s.

Many researchers had suggested that this was due to human-driven global warming, which appeared to be taking place rapidly at that time (though it has since?gone on hold for 15 years or so, a circumstance which science is still assimilating).? Read more »