Wind farm

Hey, Megan; about those 4.5 windfarms per year …

A quick question for you, Minister of Energy and Resources: Does your calculation which results in New Zealand needing 4.5 windfarms (of unstated size and rating) take into account the turbines’ dismal performance after a few years? Quote.

YA new study of 3000 wind turbines in the UK has been reported in The Telegraph and it is not good news for the 4.5 windfarms per year as they are wearing out more rapidly that was first thought.

The analysis of almost 3,000 onshore wind turbines ? the biggest study of its kind ?warns that they will continue to generate electricity effectively for just 12 to 15 years.

The wind energy industry and the Government base all their calculations on turbines enjoying a lifespan of 20 to 25 years.

The study estimates that routine wear and tear will more than double the cost of electricity being produced by wind farms in the next decade.

Older turbines will need to be replaced more quickly than the industry estimates while many more will need to be built onshore if the Government is to meet renewable energy targets by 2020.

The extra cost is likely to be passed on to households, which already pay about ?1?billion a year in a consumer subsidy that is added to electricity bills.

The report?s author, Prof Gordon Hughes, an economist at Edinburgh University and a former energy adviser to the World Bank, discovered that the ?load factor? ? the efficiency rating of a turbine based on the percentage of electricity it actually produces compared with its theoretical maximum ? is reduced from 24 per cent in the first 12 months of operation to just 11 per cent after 15 years. […]

Prof Hughes said in his conclusion: ?Adjusted for age and wind availability, the overall performance of wind farms in the UK has deteriorated markedly since the beginning of the century.

?In addition, larger wind farms have systematically worse performance than smaller wind farms.? […]

He said: ?I strongly believe the bigger turbines are proving more difficult to manage and more likely to interfere with one another.

“British turbines have got bigger and wind farms have got bigger and they are creating turbulence which puts more stress on them.

“It is this stress that causes the breakdowns and maintenance requirements that is underlying the problem in performance that I have been seeing.? […]

The report, published last week by the Renewable Energy Foundation (REF), a think tank that has campaigned against wind farms, will give ammunition to sceptics, especially within the Conservative Party, who believe the cost of subsidies to the wind industry is far too high and that the growing number of turbines are blighting the countryside. […]

?Bluntly, wind turbines onshore and offshore still cost too much and wear out far too quickly to offer the developing world a realistic alternative to coal.?

Prof Hughes said his analysis had uncovered a ?hidden? truth that was not even known to the industry. His report was sent to an independent statistician at University College London who confirmed its findings. […]

Dr Gordon Edge, the Director of policy at RenewableUK, the body that represents Britain?s wind farm industry, said: ?Wind farm developers only earn money for the clean electricity they actually generate, so it?s very much in their interests to make sure that their turbines are maintained? to an optimum level, which includes upgrading as the technology improves.

?Better turbines are being developed all the time, so it?s absurd to focus purely on the past as this report does, and pretend that that?s the way things are going to be in the future.? End quote.

Oh well, that’s all tickety boo then.

Minister Woods: How are the efficiency factors and load ratings performing for the 4.5 windfarms build in 2018? (Asking for a friend.)

Dunedin Council axes wind farm

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Whaleoil covered this story two months ago:

The battle lines have been drawn on a wind farm project that has ?polarised? Blueskin Bay.

The depth of feeling about the project was highlighted by the packed public gallery at yesterday?s resource consent hearing for Blueskin Resilient Communities Trust?s (BRCT) $5million to $6million proposal to build three wind turbines on Porteous Hill, north of Dunedin.

The hearing began with a blow to the BRCT as council planner Darryl Sycamore no longer recommended consent be approved.

He said he was reserving his position until the end of the hearing, given the trust had made changes to the proposal.

The changes included reducing the maximum height of the wind turbines to 90m from the original 125m.

Worries about birds striking turbines, noise and health were among the issues brought up yesterday, but a key concern was around the impact on the area?s landscape.

The trust and its supporters said any negative effects would be more than made up for by the benefits, including reducing New Zealand?s reliance on carbon-producing power plants.

Thank goodness the Dunedin City Council didn’t believe a bar of it.?? Read more »

Hot air and cold air both blow over South Island wind farm

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The battle lines have been drawn on a wind farm project that has “polarised” Blueskin Bay.

The depth of feeling about the project was highlighted by the packed public gallery at yesterday’s resource consent hearing for Blueskin Resilient Communities Trust’s (BRCT) $5million to $6million proposal to build three wind turbines on Porteous Hill, north of Dunedin.

The hearing began with a blow to the BRCT as council planner Darryl Sycamore no longer recommended consent be approved.

He said he was reserving his position until the end of the hearing, given the trust had made changes to the proposal.

The changes included reducing the maximum height of the wind turbines to 90m from the original 125m.

Worries about birds striking turbines, noise and health were among the issues brought up yesterday, but a key concern was around the impact on the area’s landscape. Read more »

A ludicrous waste of money for its relatively small amount of intermittent power

A wind farm in the UK has been axed after the government pulls all the subsidies.

To the rage of the Greenies and the delight of countless thousands of local residents, the Government announced on Friday its rejection of the ?3.6 billion scheme by a Franco-Dutch consortium to build a monster wind farm covering up to 76 square miles of sea between Dorset and the Isle of Wight, blocking off some of the most valued sea views in southern England.

The developers offered two versions of their scheme, one of up to 194 giant 3.5 megawatt (MW) turbines, taller than Blackpool Tower, the other of only 105 6MW turbines covering a smaller area. But at the forefront of the reasons for rejecting the project, as I reported last year, was the warning from Unesco that its scale threatened the unique status of Dorset?s ?Jurassic Coast?, Britain?s only natural World Heritage site.

[…]

The only reason why those foreign firms were attracted to ?Navitus Bay? (a name no one had heard of until they invented it) was the colossal subsidies the Government gives to offshore wind farms, which would have earned them ?430 million a year, more than two thirds of it in subsidies paid through our electricity bills. ?? Read more »

Hang on a minute I thought it was fracking that polluted water

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Oh my word, I can’t wait to hear the child MP Gareth Hughes ask questions in parliament about how the government will guarantee water supplies to be free from pollution….from wind farms.

Campaigners in Scotland are calling for a full, independent investigation into allegations that wind farms are contaminating water supplies across large areas of Scotland.

They have written to the First Minister Nicola Sturgeon and Energy Secretary Amber Rudd calling for an immediate halt on all wind farm development north of the border until the government can guarantee safe drinking water for everyone.

The problem first came to light when residents living near Europe?s largest wind farm, the 215 turbine Whitelee farm in Ayrshire, began to suffer from diarrhoea and severe vomiting. Tipped off by an NHS report which mentioned that difficulties in treating the water supply may pose health risks, local resident Dr Rachel Connor, a retired clinical radiologist, started digging into the council?s water testing results.

She found that, between May 2010 and April 2013, high readings of E.coli and other coliform bacteria had been recorded. In addition, readings of the chemical trihalomethane (THM), linked to various cancers, still births and miscarriages, were way beyond safe limits. ? Read more »

“Bird Chopper” wind farm fined millions in US for killing hundreds of birds

As is usual the “green” energy solutions proposed by the green taliban adherents are actually as far from being green as is possible.

A wind farm in the US has copped millions in fines for chopping up hundreds of birds including nearly 40 golden eagles.

Breitbart reports:

Power company PacifiCorp will cough up $2.5 million in fines after its Wyoming wind farm was found to have killed 38 golden eagles and 336 other protected birds.

The Justice Department prosecuted the company?s green energy project, asserting that the company failed to build the windmills in a way that would minimize the threat to endangered birds.

?PacifiCorp Energy built two of its Wyoming wind projects in a manner it knew would likely result in the deaths of eagles and other protected birds,? said Sam Hirsch, Acting Assistant Attorney General for the Justice Department?s Environment and Natural Resources Division in a statement in December.

PacifiCorp pleaded guilty to the charges earlier this month, according to the Associated Press. ?? Read more »

Is the case for wind power running out of puff?

As regular readers will know I abhor wind power.

It is for a number of reasons…visual pollution, noise pollution, their bird and bat destroying un-green-ness and the fact that wind power doesn’t work unless it is subsidised.

The UK more than most countries has ‘invested’ billions in wind technology, which has proved spectacularly useless at producing power.

UK electricity demand hit its highest level this winter on Monday ? while wind turbines generated their lowest output, official figures show.

Cold weather saw UK demand hit 52.54 gigawatts (GW) between 5pm and 5.30pm, according to National Grid.

At the same time, low wind speeds meant the UK?s wind turbines were producing just 573 megawatts of power, enough to meet only one per cent of demand – the lowest of any peak period this winter, Telegraph analysis of official data shows.

Earlier on Monday wind output had dropped even lower, generating just 354 megawatts at 2pm, or 0.75 per cent of Britain?s needs ? the lowest seen during any period this winter.

The analysis will fuel concerns that despite receiving billions of pounds in subsidies, Britain?s wind farms cannot be relied upon to keep the lights on when they are needed the most.

Britain now has about 12 GW of wind capacity installed on and offshore – meaning during Monday’s peak demand period, wind farms were generating less than five per cent of their theoretical maximum output.

Gas, coal and nuclear power plants instead provided the vast majority of the UK?s electricity needs.

A spokesman for National Grid said that Britain?s spare margins ? the safety buffer between supply and demand ? had remained ?adequate?.

On average, UK wind farms produce about 28 per cent of their theoretical maximum power output.

But critics warn that cold snaps when demand soars can often coincide with periods when the wind doesn’t blow.

Read more »

Wind power project canned in Tassie, not economically viable

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If Tasmania, with all its wind, can’t make a wind farm economically viable then no one can.

Hydro Tasmania has killed off a $2 billion wind farm planned for King Island.

The state-owned power generator said the project was not economically viable.

Hydro had planned to build a 600 megawatt wind farm on the island, with the power generated to be connected to the National Electricity Market via a high-voltage underwater cable across Bass Strait to Victoria. ? Read more »

Bird mincing wind turbines are now killing umpteen bats

I hate wind farms, they are unsightly, make a huge noise, kill migrating birds and use huge quantities of rare earth metals making them not green at all…on top of that they are dreadfully inefficient and only work with huge government subsidies.

To cap all that off, they are also now killing bats.

Endangered bats are being killed by wind turbine blades because the air currents are similar to those near tall trees, a study shows.

It?s feared the legally protected mammals are dying while hunting insects that are attracted by the heat generated by the spinning blades.

Thousands of bats have been killed by wind turbines causing a population decline that could cost the farming industry billions each year.

The nocturnal creatures are welcomed by farmers across the world as they eat large numbers of insects that usually damage crops. ? Read more »

David Cameron mans up over wind farms

David Cameron is planning on going into the election promising to rid the countryside of appalling bird shredders.

Top stuff, and given they are hopeless at actually providing power will be a massive blessing as their subsidised uselessness is eradicated.

David Cameron wants to go into the next election pledging to ?rid? the countryside of onshore wind farms, a source close to the Prime Minister has said.

Mr Cameron wants to toughen planning laws and tear up subsidy rules to make current turbines financially unviable ? allowing the Government to ?eradicate? turbines, the source said.? Read more »

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