Word of the Day

Word of the day

The word for today is…

toyetic (adj) – (Marketing) (of a film or television programme) having the potential to generate consumer interest in associated merchandise, such as toys, computer games, etc.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Toyetic, an obvious composition of toy and the adjective suffix -etic, was supposedly coined by the American toy developer and marketer Bernard Loomis (1923–2006) in a conversation with Steven Spielberg about making figures based on Spielberg’s movie Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977).

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

tawdry (adj) – 1. Gaudy and cheap in nature or appearance.
2. Shameful or indecent

(noun) – Cheap and gaudy finery.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : “No longer fresh or elegant but worn as if it were so; in cheap and ostentatious imitation of what is rich or costly,” 1670s, adjective use of noun tawdry “silk necktie for women” (1610s), shortened from tawdry lace (1540s), an alteration (with adhesion of the -t- from Saint) of St. Audrey’s lace, a necktie or ribbon sold at the annual fair at Ely on Oct. 17 commemorating St. Audrey (queen of Northumbria, died 679). Her association with lace necklaces is that she supposedly died of a throat tumor, which, according to Bede, she considered God’s punishment for her youthful stylishness:

“I know of a surety that I deservedly bear the weight of my trouble on my neck, for I remember that, when I was a young maiden, I bore on it the needless weight of necklaces; and therefore I believe the Divine goodness would have me endure the pain in my neck, that so I may be absolved from the guilt of my needless levity, having now, instead of gold and pearls, the fiery heat of a tumour rising on my neck.” [A.M. Sellar translation, 1907]

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

taradiddle (noun) – (Variant of tarradiddle.) 1. A petty falsehood; a fib.
2. Silly pretentious speech or writing; twaddle.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : The true origin of taradiddle is unknown, but that doesn’t mean you won’t encounter a lot of balderdash about its history. Some folks try to connect it to the verb diddle (one meaning of which is “to swindle or cheat”), but that connection hasn’t been proven and may turn out to be poppycock. You may even hear some tommyrot about this particular sense of diddle coming from the Old English verb didrian, which meant “to deceive,” but that couldn’t be true unless didrian was somehow suddenly revived after eight or nine centuries of disuse. No one even knows when taradiddle was first used. It must have been before it showed up in a 1796 dictionary of colloquial speech (where it was defined as a synonym of fib), but if we claimed we knew who said it first, and when, we’d be dishing out pure applesauce.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

sibilate (verb) – 1. To utter or pronounce with a hissing sound.
2. To hiss.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Sibilate comes from Latin sībilātus, past participle of the verb sībilāre “to hiss, hiss in disapproval.” From sībilant-, the present participle stem of sībilāre, English has the noun and adjective sibilant, used in phonetics in reference to hissing sounds like s or z. Sibilate entered English in the 17th century.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

secrete (verb) – 1. To generate and release (a substance) from a cell or a gland.
2. To conceal in a hiding place; cache.
3. To steal secretly; filch.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : If you guessed that the secret to the origins of secrete is the word secret, you are correct. Secrete developed in the mid-18th century as an alteration of a now obsolete verb secret. That verb had the meaning now carried by secrete and derived from the familiar noun secret (“something kept hidden or unexplained”).

The noun, in turn, traces back to the Latin secretus, the past participle of the verb secernere, meaning “to separate” or “to distinguish.” Incidentally, there is an earlier and distinct verb secrete with the more scientific meaning “to form and give off (a secretion).” That secrete is a back-formation from secretion, another word that can be traced back to secernere.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

schmooze (verb) – To converse casually, especially in order to gain an advantage or make a social connection.

(noun) – The act or an instance of schmoozing.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Schmooze (also spelled shmooze) is one of a small, but significant, number of words borrowed from Yiddish that have become relatively common members of the English language. Other such words include chutzpah, lox, maven, mensch, nebbish, schlep, and schlock. Though classified as a High German language, Yiddish also borrows from the Slavic and Latinate languages as well as from Aramaic and Hebrew. It was the Hebrew shěmu’ōth (“news, rumor”) that provided Yiddish with the noun shmues (“talk”) and the verb shmuesn (“to talk or chat”). Although originally used in English to indicate simply talking in an informal and warm manner, schmooze has since also taken on the suggestion of discussion for the purposes of gaining something.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

reticulate (adj) – 1. Resembling or forming a net or network.
2. Relating to or being an evolutionary process that involves the exchange of genes between organisms of different species, as in the formation of a new species through hybridization.

(verb) – 1. To make a net or network of.
2. To mark with lines resembling a network.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1650s, from Latin reticulatus “having a net-like pattern,” from reticulum “little net,” diminutive of rete “net,” a word of uncertain origin, perhaps related to Lithuanian rėtis “sieve,” or perhaps a loan-word from a non-IE language.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

resplendent (adj) – Splendid or dazzling in appearance; brilliant.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Resplendent has a lot in common with splendid (meaning, among other things, “shining” or “brilliant”), splendent (“shining” or “glossy”), and splendor (“brightness” or “luster”). Each of these glowing terms gets its shine from the Latin verb splendēre (“to shine”). In the case of resplendent, the prefix re- added to splendēre, formed the Latin resplendēre, meaning “to shine back.” Splendent, splendor, and resplendent were first used in English during the 15th century, but splendid didn’t light up our language until over 175 years later; its earliest known use dates from the early 1600s.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

psittacine (adj) – 1. Relating to, resembling, or characteristic of parrots.
2. Of or belonging to the family Psittacidae, which includes the macaws, parakeets, and most other parrots.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : The English adjective psittacine comes straight from Latin psittacinus, which comes straight from the Greek adjective psittákinos, a derivative of the noun psittakós “parrot” and the common adjective suffix -inos. Sittakós and bittakós, variant spellings of psittakós, confirm what one would expect, that psittakós is not a native Greek word. Psittacine entered English in the 19th century.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

polychromatic (adj) – 1. Having or exhibiting many colours.
2. Of or composed of radiation of more than one wavelength.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : English polychromatic is a borrowing from French polychromatique, which comes from Greek polychrṓmatos “many-colored, variegated” and the suffix -ique, from the Greek suffix -ikos or the Latin suffix -icus. Polychromatic is used mostly, but not exclusively, in the physical sciences, e.g., hematology, physics, and formerly in chemistry. Polychromatic entered English in the 19th century.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.