Word of the Day

Word of the day

The word for today is…

indigent (adj) – 1. Experiencing want or need; impoverished: distributed food to indigent families.
2. (Archaic) Lacking or deficient.

(noun) – A poor or destitute person.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Circa 1400, from Old French indigent “poor, needy,” from Latin indigentem “in want of, needing”. As a noun, “poor person,” from early 15th century.

Word of the day

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incogitant (adj) – Thoughtless; inconsiderate.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Analyzing the composition of incogitant is a little tricky. The Latin negative prefix in- is clear enough (it is related to English un-); the participial ending -ant will be familiar to those who know French or Latin; and many will be familiar with the French philosopher and mathematician René Descartes’ (1596–1650) statement cōgitō ergō sum (“I think therefore I am”). The Latin verb cōgitāre “to think” can be broken down further to co-, a variant of com-, here used as an intensive suffix, and the verb agitāre “to set in motion, drive” (the co- and the a- of agitāre contract into a long ō). Agitāre is a frequentative verb (at least in form) formed from the simple verb agree “to drive (animals), do, make.” Incogitant entered English in the 17th century.

Word of the day

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iconoclast (noun) – 1. One who attacks and seeks to overthrow traditional or popular ideas or institutions.
2. One who destroys sacred religious images.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : “Breaker or destroyer of images,” 1590s, from French iconoclaste and directly from Medieval Latin iconoclastes, from Late Greek eikonoklastes, from eikon (genitive eikonos) “image” + klastes “breaker,” from klas- past tense stem of klan “to break”.

Originally in reference to those in the Eastern Church in 8th century and 9th century whose mobs of followers destroyed icons and other religious objects on the grounds that they were idols. Applied to 16th century-17th century Protestants in Netherlands who vandalised former Catholic churches on similar grounds. Extended sense of “one who attacks orthodox beliefs or cherished institutions” is first attested 1842.

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hustings (noun) – 1. (a) A place where political campaign speeches are made.
(b) The activities involved in political campaigning.
2. (Chiefly British) A court formerly held in some English cities and still held infrequently in London.
3. (Chiefly British) (a) A platform on which candidates for Parliament formerly stood to address the electors.
(b) The proceedings of a parliamentary election.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Old English husting “meeting, court, tribunal,” from Old Norse husðing “council,” from hus “house” + ðing “assembly”; so called because it was a meeting of the men who formed the “household” of a nobleman or king. The native Anglo-Saxon word for this was folc-gemot. The plural became the usual form circa 1500; sense of “temporary platform for political speeches” developed by 1719, apparently from London’s Court of Hustings, presided over by the Lord Mayor, which was held on a platform in the Guildhall. This sense then broadened by mid-19th century to “the election process generally.”

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hobbyhorse (noun) – 1. A child’s riding toy that consists of a long stick with an imitation horse’s head on one end.
2. (a) A figure of a horse worn attached to the waist of a mummer, as in a morris dance.
(b) A person wearing such a figure.
3. (a) A favorite hobby.
(b) A topic that one frequently brings up or dwells on; a fixation.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Also hobby-horse, 1550s, “mock horse used in the morris dance;” 1580s, “child’s toy riding horse,” from hobby + horse. Transferred sense of “favorite pastime or avocation” first recorded 1670s (shortened to hobby by 1816). The connecting notion being “activity that doesn’t go anywhere.”

The hobbyhorse originally was a “Tourney Horse,” a wooden or basketwork frame worn around the waist and held on with shoulder straps, with a fake tail and horse head attached, so the wearer appears to be riding a horse. These were part of church and civic celebrations at Midsummer and New Year’s throughout England.

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gravid (adj) – Carrying developing young or eggs, pregnant.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : “Pregnant,” 1590s, from Latin gravidus “loaded, full, swollen; pregnant with child,” from gravis “burdened, heavy,” from PIE root *gwere- “heavy.”

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funster (noun) – (informal) A joker; an entertainer.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology :
The origin of the English suffix -ster, as in funster, is the Old English suffix -estre, which was used to form feminine agent nouns corresponding to masculine agent nouns in -ere, e.g., bæcere “baker” and bæcestre “female baker” (the source of the family name Baxter). Even in Old English the suffix -estre was used to form masculine agent nouns; thus we have today the doublets weaver (with the masculine suffix) and, with the originally feminine suffix, the archaic agent noun webster (source of the family name Webster). By the late 16th century, the suffix -ster acquired a humorous or disparaging sense, as in rhymester (along with the neutral youngster). Punster dates from the end of the 17th century and may have been the model for funster. The suffix nowadays is mostly humorous or disparaging as in gangster (late 19th century), the model for bankster, which also dates from the late 19th century. Funster entered English in the late 18th century.

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fructify (verb) – To make fruitful or productive. To bear fruit.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Mid-14th century., “bear fruit,” from Old French fructifiier “bear fruit, grow, develop” (12th century), from Late Latin fructificare “bear fruit,” from Latin fructus “fruit, crops; profit, enjoyment” (from PIE root *bhrug- “to enjoy,” with derivatives referring to agricultural products) + combining form of facere “to make, do” (from PIE root *dhe- “to set, put”). Transitive use from 1580s.

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exasperation (noun) – 1. The act or an instance of exasperating.
2. The state of being exasperated; frustrated annoyance.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1540s, from Late Latin exasperationem (nominative exasperatio), noun of action from past participle stem of exasperare “roughen; irritate”.

Word of the day

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eclectic (adj) – 1. Selecting or employing individual elements from a variety of sources, systems, or styles.
2. Made up of or combining elements from a variety of sources.

(noun) – One that follows an eclectic method.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1680s, “not confined to or following any one model or system,” originally in reference to ancient philosophers who selected doctrines from every system; from French eclectique (1650s), from Greek eklektikos “selective,” literally “picking out,” from eklektos “selected,” from eklegein “pick out, select,” from ek “out” + legein “gather, choose,” from PIE root *leg- “to collect, gather.” Broader sense of “borrowed from diverse sources” is first recorded 1847. As a noun from 1817.