Word of the Day

Word of the day

The word for today is…

effete (adj) – 1.(a) Characterised by extreme refinement or self-indulgence, often to the point of unworldiness or decadence.
(b) Having or reflecting an attitude of social superiority; pretentious or snobbis.
2. Depleted of vitality, force, or effectiveness; exhausted.
3. Effeminate).
4. (Archaic) No longer productive; infertile.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1620s, “functionless as a result of age or exhaustion,” from Latin effetus (usually in fem. effeta) “exhausted, unproductive, worn out (with bearing offspring), past bearing,” literally “that has given birth,” from a lost verb, *efferi, from assimilated form of ex “out” + fetus “childbearing, offspring”. Figurative use is earliest in English; literal use is rare. Sense of “intellectually or morally exhausted” (1790) led to that of “decadent, effeminate” (by 1850s).

Word of the Day

Word of the day

The word for today is…

doughboy (noun) – 1. A piece of bread dough that is rolled thin and fried in deep fat.
2. An American infantryman in World War I.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : “U.S. soldier,” 1864, American English, said to have been in oral use from 1854, or from the Mexican-American War (1847), it is perhaps from resemblance of big buttons on old uniforms to a sort of biscuit of that name (1680s), but there are various other conjectures.

Word of the Day

Word of the day

The word for today is…

decadent (adj) – 1. Being in a state of decline or decay.
2. Marked by or providing unrestrained gratification; self-indulgent.
3. Often Decadent Of or relating to literary Decadence.

(noun) – 1. A person in a condition or process of mental or moral decay.
2. Often Decadent A member of the Decadence movement.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : “In a state of decline or decay (from a former condition of excellence),” 1837, from French décadent, back-formation from décadence. In reference to literary (later, other artistic) schools that believed, or affected to believe, they lived in an age of artistic decadence, 1885 in French, 1888 in English. Usually in a bad sense.

Bread, supposedly the staff of life, has become one of our most decadent foods — doughy, gummy, and without the aroma, flavour, texture, taste and appearance that is typical of good bread. [“College and University Business” 1960]

Beckoning sense of “desirable and satisfying to self-indulgence” begins circa 1970 in commercial publications in reference to desserts.

Word of the Day

Word of the day

The word for today is…

courtesy (noun) – 1.(a) Polite behaviour.
(b) A polite gesture or remark.
2.(a) Consent or agreement in spite of fact; indulgence.
(b) Willingness or generosity in providing something needed.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Circa 1200, curteisie, “courtly ideals; chivalry, chivalrous conduct,” also “a courteous act,” from Old French curteisie (Modern French courtoisie), from curteis “courteous”. From circa 1300 as “good will, kindness,” also “a reward, a gift;” mid-14th century as “refinement, gentlemanly conduct.” A specialised sense of curteisie is the source of English curtsy.

Word of the Day

Word of the day

The word for today is…

chivalry (noun) – 1. The medieval system, principles, and customs of knighthood.
2.(a) The qualities idealised by knighthood, such as bravery, courtesy, honor, and gallantry toward women.
(b) A manifestation of any of these qualities.
3. A group of knights or gallant gentlemen.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Circa 1300, “body or host of knights; knighthood in the feudal social system; bravery in war, warfare as an art,” from Old French chevalerie “knighthood, chivalry, nobility, cavalry, art of war,” from chevaler “knight,” from Medieval Latin caballarius “horseman,” from Latin caballus “nag, pack-horse.

From late 14th century as “the nobility as one of the estates of the realm,” also as the word for an ethical code emphasising honour, valor, generosity and courtly manners. Modern use for “social and moral code of medieval feudalism” probably is an 18th century historical revival.

Word of the Day

Word of the day

The word for today is…

chauvinist (noun) – 1. Militant devotion to and glorification of one’s country; fanatical patriotism.
2. Prejudiced belief in the superiority of one’s own gender, group, or kind.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1863, from French chauviniste, from Chauvin + -ist.

Nicolas Chauvin is a legendary, possibly apocryphal French soldier and patriot who is supposed to have served in the First Army of the French Republic and subsequently in La Grande Armée of Napoleon. His name is the eponym of chauvinism, originally a term for excessive nationalistic fervour, but later used to refer to any form of bigotry or bias.

Word of the Day

Word of the day

The word for today is…

animation (noun) – 1. The act, process, or result of imparting life, interest, spirit, motion, or activity.
2. The quality or condition of being alive, active, spirited, or vigorous.
3.(a) The art or process of making movies with drawings, computer graphics, or photographs of static objects, including all techniques other than the continuous filming of live-action images.
(b) Images or special effects created through animation.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1590s, “action of imparting life” (a sense now obsolete), from Latin animationem (nominative animatio) “an animating,” noun of action from past participle stem of animare “give breath to,” also “to endow with a particular spirit, to give courage to, enliven,” from anima “life, breath” (from PIE root *ane- “to breathe”). Meaning “vitality, appearance of activity or life” is from 1610s (the sense in suspended animation). Cinematographic sense, “production of moving cartoon pictures” is from 1912.

Word of the Day

Word of the day

The word for today is…

vulnerary (adj) – Used in the healing or treating of wounds.

(noun) – A remedy used in healing or treating wounds.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : The Latin adjective and noun vulnerārius first appears in the writings of the Roman polymath Pliny the Elder (23–79 a.d.), who perished in the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in 79 a.d. while trying to observe the eruption). As an adjective, vulnerārius means “(bandage) for dressing wounds”; as a noun, it means “surgeon.” Vulnerary entered English at the end of the 16th century.

Word of the Day

Word of the day

The word for today is…

doodlesack (noun) – The Scottish bagpipe.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Doodlesack, a respelling of German Dudelsack “bagpipe,” literally “bagpipe sack,” is a rare word in English. The German word is, or seems to be, a derivative of dudeln “to tootle” (unless the verb is a derivative of the noun). Even in German Dudelsack appears not to be a native word but is likely to be a borrowing from a Slavic language, e.g., Polish and Czech dudy “bagpipe.” Doodlesack entered English in the mid-19th century.

Word of the Day

Word of the day

The word for today is…

enfant terrible (noun) – One whose startlingly unconventional behavior, work, or thought embarrasses or disturbs others.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : In French enfant terrible means “terrible child,” one whose language and behavior are embarrassing to adults. From the beginning of the appearance of enfant terrible in English in the mid-19th century, the phrase has also referred to adults who embarrass or compromise their party or faction by outrageous speech or behaviour, especially artists or other creative people notorious for their unconventional lifestyle.

Word of the Day