Word of the Day

Word of the day

The word for today is…

vogie (adj) – 1. conceited
2. happy or cheerful.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : The adjective vogie is Scottish through and through, and all the citations of the word come from Scottish authors. Vogie has no good etymology: it is tempting to etymologize the word as vogue plus the suffix -ie, but the meanings of vogue and vogie do not match. Vogie entered English in the 18th century.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

soteriology (noun) – The branch of theology dealing with the nature and means of salvation.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1847, in reference to health; 1864 in reference to salvation, from German soteriologie, from Greek soteria “preservation, salvation,” from soizein “save, preserve,” related to sos “safe, healthy,” of uncertain origin (perhaps from PIE root *teue- “to swell”). With -ology.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

sot (noun) – A drunkard.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Late Old English sott “stupid person, fool,” from Old French sot, from Gallo-Roman *sott- (probably related to Medieval Latin sottus, circa 800), of uncertain origin, with cognates from Portugal to Germany. Surviving meaning “one who is stupefied with drink” first recorded 1590s. As a verb, it is attested from circa 1200, but usually besot.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

recalcitrant (adj) – 1. Stubbornly resistant to or defiant of authority or guidance.
2. Difficult to manage or deal with.
3. Resistant to chemical decomposition; decomposing extremely slowly.

(noun) – A recalcitrant person.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1823, from French récalcitrant, literally “kicking back” (17-18 century), past participle of recalcitrare “to kick back; be inaccessible,” from re- “back” + Latin calcitrare “to kick,” from calx (genitive calcis) “heel”. Used from 1797 as a French word in English.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

punnet (noun) – (British, Australian) A small basket for fruit, such as strawberries.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : In the “Cyclops” episode (chapter 12) of Ulysses, there are 33 parodies in exaggerated, sentimental, or pompous styles. The first of these parodies begins “In Inisfail the fair,” a parody of a poem by the Irish poet James Mangin (1803-49), and contains, among other things, an extravagant list of Irish products: “… pearls of the earth, and punnets of mushrooms and custard marrows….”

A punnet is a light, shallow container for fruits or other produce. The word is used in Ireland, England, and Australia but not in America. Its origin is uncertain. Punnet entered English in the 19th century.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

névé ( (noun) – 1. The upper part of a glacier where the snow turns into ice.
2. (a) A snow field at the head of a glacier.
(b) The granular snow typically found in such a field.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : “Field of granular snow, firn,” 1843, from French névé (19th century), probably from Savoyard névi “mass of snow,” from Latin nivem (nominative nix) “snow” (source of French neige), from PIE root *sneigwh- “snow, to snow”.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

leonine (adj) – 1. Of, relating to, or characteristic of a lion.
2. Resembling or suggestive of a lion, as in being powerful or dignified.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology :  The English adjective leonine comes from Latin leōnīnus, a derivative of the noun leō (inflectional stem leōn-), a borrowing from Greek léōn (inflectional stem léont-). Léōn is not a Greek word, but it does look somewhat like Hebrew lābhī; both the Greek and the Hebrew nouns may be borrowings from a third language. The Greek historian Herodotus (484?-425? b.c.) and the philosopher Aristotle (384-322 b.c.) both assert that lions were rare in Europe in their day but were still found. Leonine entered English in the 14th century.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

clickbait (noun) – Provocative or sensationalistic headline text that entices people to click on a link to an article, used as a publishing tactic to increase webpage views and associated ad revenue.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : From click +‎ bait.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

chaebol (noun) – A conglomerate of businesses, usually owned by a single family, especially in Korea.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1980s: Korean, literally ‘money clan’.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

isopolity (noun) – Equality of political rights.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : The Greek philosopher Aristotle (384-322 b.c.) was the first author to use isopolīteía “equality of civic rights.” Isopolīteía applied to individuals and communities; it also meant reciprocity of such rights between states (as by treaty). Polīteía “citizenship, daily life of a citizen, body of citizens; government, polity, constitution” is a derivative of the noun pólis “citadel (of a city), city, one’s city or country.” Pólis comes the very complicated Proto-Indo-European root pel-, pelǝ-, plē- “citadel, fortified elevation, city.” The same root yields the Sanskrit noun pū́r “citadel, city” (Singapur “Singapore” means “Lion City”), and Lithuanian pilìs “citadel, castle.” Isopolity entered English in the 19th century.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.