Word of the Day

Word of the day

The word for today is…

finesse (noun) – 1. Refinement and delicacy of performance, execution, or artisanship.
2. Skillful, subtle handling of a situation; tactful, diplomatic maneuvering.
3. A method of leading up to a tenace, as in bridge, in order to prevent an opponent from winning the trick with an intermediate card.
4. A stratagem in which one appears to decline an advantage.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1520s, “fineness” (obsolete); 1530s, “artifice, delicate stratagem,” from Middle French finesse “fineness, subtlety,” from Old French fin “subtle, delicate”

Word of the day

The word for today is…

callow (adj) –  Lacking adult maturity or experience; immature.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Old English calu “bare, bald,” from Proto-Germanic *kalwa- (source also of Middle Dutch calu, Dutch kaal, Old High German kalo, German Kahl), from PIE root *gal- “bald, naked” (source also of Russian golyi “smooth, bald”). From young birds with no feathers, meaning extended to any young inexperienced thing or creature (1570s). Apparently not related to Latin calvus “bald.”

Word of the day

The word for today is…

autarky (noun) – 1. A policy of national self-sufficiency and nonreliance on imports or economic aid.
2. A self-sufficient region or country.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1610s, “self-sufficiency,” from Greek autarkeia “sufficiency in oneself, independence,” from autarkes “self-sufficient, having enough, independent of others” (also used of countries), from autos “self” + arkein “to ward off, keep off,” also “to be strong enough, sufficient,” from PIE root *ark- “to hold, contain, guard”. From a different Greek source than autarchy, and thus the spelling. As a term in international economics, prominent late 1930s.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

truth (noun) – 1. (a) Conformity to fact or actuality.
(b) Reality; actuality.
(c) The reality of a situation.
2. (a) A statement proven to be or accepted as true.
(b) Such statements considered as a group.
3. Sincerity; integrity.
4. Fidelity to an original or standard.
5. Theology & Philosophy That which is considered to be the ultimate ground of reality.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Old English triewð (West Saxon), treowð (Mercian) “faith, faithfulness, fidelity, loyalty; veracity, quality of being true; pledge, covenant,” from triewe, treowe “faithful”, with Proto-Germanic abstract noun suffix *-itho.

Sense of “something that is true” is first recorded mid-14th century. Meaning “accuracy, correctness” is from 1560s. English and most other IE languages do not have a primary verb for for “speak the truth,” as a contrast to lie. Truth squad in U.S. political sense first attested in the 1952 U.S. presidential election campaign.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

psephology (noun) –  The study of political elections.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : “Study of elections,” 1952, from Greek psephizein “to vote” (properly “to vote with pebbles,” from psephos “pebble”) + -logy.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

patois (noun) – 1. (a) A regional dialect, especially one without a literary tradition.
(b) Nonstandard speech.
2. The special jargon of a group; cant.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : “A provincial dialect,” 1640s, from French patois “native or local speech” (13th century), of uncertain origin, probably from Old French patoier “handle clumsily, to paw,” from pate “a paw,” from Vulgar Latin *patta, from notion of clumsy manner of speaking. Compare French pataud “properly, a young dog with big paws, then an awkwardly built fellow”. Especially in reference to Jamaican English from 1934.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

narcissism (noun) – 1. Excessive preoccupation with or admiration of oneself.
2. A personality disorder characterised by an exaggerated sense of self-importance, need for admiration, and lack of empathy.
3. Pleasure derived from contemplation or admiration of one’s own body or self, considered in psychoanalytic theory to be a fixation on or a regression to an infantile stage of development.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1905, from German Narzissismus, coined 1899 (in “Die sexuellen Perversitäten”), by German psychiatrist Paul Näcke (1851-1913), on a comparison suggested 1898 by Havelock Ellis, from Greek Narkissos, name of a beautiful youth in mythology (Ovid, “Metamorphoses,” iii.370) who fell in love with his own reflection in a spring and was turned to the flower narcissus. Coleridge used the word in a letter from 1822.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

talisman (noun) – 1. An object marked with magic signs and believed to confer on its bearer supernatural powers or protection.
2. Something that apparently has magic power.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1630s, “magical figure cut or engraved under certain observances,” from French talisman, in part via Arabic tilsam (plural tilsaman), from Byzantine Greek telesma “talisman, religious rite, payment,” earlier “consecration, ceremony,” originally in ancient Greek “completion,” from telein “perform (religious rites), pay (tax), fulfill,” from telos “end, fulfillment, completion”. The Arabic word also was borrowed into Turkish, Persian, Hindi.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

stochastic (adj) – 1. Of, relating to, or characterised by conjecture; conjectural.
2. Statistics Involving or containing a random variable or process.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1660s, “pertaining to conjecture,” from Greek stokhastikos “able to guess, conjecturing,” from stokhazesthai “to guess, aim at, conjecture,” from stokhos “a guess, aim, target, mark,” literally “pointed stick set up for archers to shoot at,” from PIE *stogh-, variant of root *stegh- “to stick, prick; pointed”. The sense of “randomly determined” is from 1934, from German stochastik (1917).

Word of the day

The word for today is…

simpatico (adj) – 1. Of like mind or temperament; compatible.
2. Having attractive qualities; pleasing.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1864 (in fem. form simpatica), from Spanish simpatico “sympathetic,” from simpatia “sympathy,” or from Italian simpatico, from simpatia, both ultimately from Latin sympathia.