Word of the Day

Word of the day

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perfidious (adj) – Of, relating to, or marked by perfidy; treacherous. See Synonyms of faithless.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1590s, from Latin perfidiosus “treacherous,” from perfidia

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pedantic (adj) – Characterised by a narrow, often ostentatious concern for academic knowledge and formal rules

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Formed in English circa 1600, from pedant + -ic. The French equivalent is pédantesque. Perhaps first attested in John Donne’s “Sunne Rising,” where he bids the morning sun let his love and him linger in bed, telling it, “Sawcy pedantique wretch, goe chide Late schooleboyes.”

Word of the day

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pedant (noun) – 1. One who ostentatiously exhibits academic knowledge or who pays undue attention to minor details or formal rules.
2. (Obsolete) A schoolmaster.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1580s, “schoolmaster,” from Middle French pédant (1560s) or directly from Italian pedante, literally “teacher, schoolmaster,” of uncertain origin, apparently an alteration of Late Latin paedagogantem (nominative paedagogans), present participle of paedagogare. Meaning “person who trumpets minor points of learning” first recorded 1590s.

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drupe (noun) – A fleshy fruit, such as a peach, plum, or cherry, usually having a single hard stone that encloses a seed. Also called stone fruit.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1753, from Modern Latin drupa “stone-fruit,” from Latin drupa (oliva) “wrinkled olive,” from Greek dryppa, short for drypepes “tree-ripened,” from drys “tree” (from PIE root *deru- “be firm, solid, steadfast,” with specialised senses “wood, tree”) + pepon “ripe”.

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dinkum (adj) –  Genuine; real.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1888, “hard work,” Australian slang, of unknown origin, perhaps connected to Lincolnshire dialect. Meaning “honest, genuine” is attested from 1894.

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diacritic (noun) – A mark, such as the cedilla of façade or the acute accent of résumé, added to a letter to indicate a special phonetic value or distinguish words that are otherwise graphically identical.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1690s, of sounds, from Greek diakritikos “that separates or distinguishes,” from diakrinein “to separate one from another,” from dia- (see dia-) + krinein “to separate, decide, judge”.

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conundrum (noun) – 1. A riddle in which a fanciful question is answered by a pun.
2. A paradoxical, insoluble, or difficult problem; a dilemma.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1590s, Oxford University slang for “pedant,” also “whim,” etc., later (1790) “riddle, puzzle.” Also spelled quonundrum. The sort of ponderous pseudo-Latin word that was once the height of humour in learned circles.

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Albion (noun) –  England or Great Britain. Often used poetically.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Ancient name of England, attested in Old English, from Latin, sometimes said to be from the non-Indo-European base *alb “mountain,” which also is suggested as the source of Latin Alpes “Alps,” Albania, and Alba, an Irish name for “Scotland.” But more likely from Latin albus “white”, which would be an apt description of the chalk cliffs of the island’s southern coast.

Breoton is garsecges ealond, ðæt wæs iu geara Albion haten. [translation of Bede’s “Historia Ecclesiastica Gentis Anglorum,” c.900 C.E.]

Perfidious Albion, a reference to the supposedly treacherous policies of Britain when dealing with foreign powers, translates French rhetorical phrase la perfide Albion, said to have been in use since 16th century but popularised by Napoleon in the recruiting drive of 1813.

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quell (verb) – 1. To put down forcibly; suppress.
2. To pacify; quiet.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Old English cwellan “to kill, murder, execute,” from Proto-Germanic *kwaljanan (source also of Old English cwelan “to die,” cwalu “violent death;” Old Saxon quellian “to torture, kill;” Old Norse kvelja “to torment;” Middle Dutch quelen “to vex, tease, torment;” Old High German quellan “to suffer pain,” German quälen “to torment, torture”), from PIE root *gwele- “to throw, reach,” with extended sense of “to pierce”. Milder sense of “suppress, extinguish” developed by circa 1300.

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pique (noun) – A state of vexation caused by a perceived slight or indignity; a feeling of wounded pride.

(verb) – 1. To cause to feel resentment or indignation.
2. To provoke; arouse.
3. To pride (oneself).

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : (noun) – 1530s, “fit of ill feeling,” from Middle French pique “a prick, sting, irritation,” noun of action from piquer.

(verb) – “To excite to anger,” 1670s, from French piquer “to prick, sting”. Softened meaning “to stimulate, excite” is from 1690s.