Word of the Day

Word of the day

The word for today is…

bellyache (noun) – 1. Pain in the stomach or abdomen; colic.
2. (Informal) A whining complaint.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Also belly-ache, 1590s, “pain in the bowels,” from belly + ache. The verb in the slang sense of “complain” is first recorded 1888, American English; it appears not to have been used earlier than that, if ever, in a literal sense.

Word of the day

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winsome (adj) –  Charming, often in a childlike or naive way.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Old English wynsum “agreeable, pleasant,” from wynn “pleasure, delight,” from Proto-Germanic *wunjo- (source also of Old Saxon wunnia, Old High German wunja, German Wonne “joy, delight”), from PIE root *wen- “to desire, strive for” + -sum. Apparently surviving only in northern English dialect for 400 years until revived 18th century by Hamilton, Burns, and other Scottish poets. Similar formation in Old Saxon wunsam, Old High German wunnisam.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

slumberous (adj) – 1. Sleepy; drowsy.
2. (a) Suggestive of or resembling sleep: a slumberous torpor.
(b) Quiet; tranquil.
3. Causing or inducing sleep; soporific.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : (slumber) Mid-14th century alteration of slumeren (mid-13th century), frequentative form of slumen “to doze,” probably from Old English sluma “light sleep” (compare Middle Dutch slumen, Dutch sluimeren, German schlummern “to slumber”). Frequentative on the notion of “intermittent light sleep.”

Word of the day

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slacktivism (noun) –  (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the public proclaiming of one’s political beliefs through activities that require little effort or commitment

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : A blend of slacker and activism.

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purloin (verb) – To steal, especially in a stealthy way.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Mid-14th century, “remove, misappropriate,” from Anglo-French purloigner “remove,” Old French porloigner “put off, retard, delay, drag out; be far away,” from por- (from Latin pro- “forth;”) + Old French loing “far,” from Latin longe, from longus “long”). Sense of “to steal” (1540s) is a development in English.

Word of the day

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puffery (noun) –  Exaggerated praise, especially when used in publicity.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : The word puffery has always meant “excessive, fulsome praise.” In the US puffery has legal or quasi-legal status. In 1957 the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) said that puffery was “frequently used to denote the exaggerations reasonably to be expected of a seller as to the degree of quality of his product, the truth or falsity of which cannot be precisely determined.” And in 1984 the FTC stated that puffery, e.g, all that French on a restaurant menu, does not authorize enforcement by the FTC: “The Commission generally will not pursue cases involving obviously exaggerated or puffing representations, i.e., those that the ordinary consumers do not take seriously.” Puffery entered English in the 18th century.

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oleaginous (adj) – 1. Of or relating to oil.
2. Falsely or smugly earnest; unctuous.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1630s, from French oléagineux (14th century), from Latin oleaginus “of the olive,” from olea “olive,” alteration of oliva by influence of oleum “oil.”

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moggy or moggie (noun) – British a slang name for cat. Sometimes shortened to mog.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Of dialect origin, originally a pet name for a cow.

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manqué (form) – Unfulfilled or frustrated in the realisation of one’s ambitions or capabilities.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1778, from French manqué (fem. manquée), past participle of manquer “to miss, be lacking” (16th century), from Italian mancare, from manco, from Latin mancus “maimed, defective,” from PIE *man-ko- “maimed in the hand,” from root *man- “hand” (from PIE root *man- “hand”).

Word of the day

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mangy (adj) – 1. Affected with, caused by, or resembling mange.
2. Shabby or squalid.
3. Mean; contemptible.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : By 1745, from mange + -y. Mange is a skin disease caused by several species of tiny mites, common external parasites found in companion canines. Some mange mites are normal residents of your dog’s skin and hair follicles, while others are not. All mites can cause mild to severe skin infections if they proliferate.