Word of the Day

Word of the day

The word for today is…

Janus-faced (adj) – Two-faced; hypocritical; deceitful

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Ancient Italic deity, to the Romans the guardian god of portals, doors, and gates; patron of beginnings and endings, circa 1500, from Latin Ianus, literally “gate, arched passageway,” perhaps from PIE root *ei- “to go” (cognates: Sanskrit yanah “path,” Old Church Slavonic jado “to travel”). He is shown as having two faces, one in front the other in back (they may represent sunrise and sunset and reflect an original role as a solar deity). His temple in Rome was closed only in times of peace.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

janitor (noun) – 1. One who attends to the maintenance or cleaning of a building.
2. A doorman or doorwoman.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1580s, “an usher in a school,” later “doorkeeper” (1620s), from Latin ianitor “doorkeeper, porter,” from ianua “door, entrance, gate,” from ianus “arched passageway, arcade” + agent suffix -tor. Meaning “caretaker of a building, man employed to see that rooms are kept clean and in order” first recorded 1708. Feminine forms were janitress (1806), janitrix (1818).

Word of the day

The word for today is…

instantiate (verb) – To represent (an abstract concept) by a concrete or tangible example.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : “Represent by an instance,” 1946, from instance (Latin instantia) + -ate.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

homogenise (verb) -1. subject (milk) to a process in which the fat droplets are emulsified and the cream does not separate.
2. make uniform or similar.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : “Make similar,” 1742, from homogenous + -ize.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

hocus-pocus (noun) – 1. Nonsense words or phrases used as a formula by quack conjurers.
2. A trick performed by a magician or juggler; sleight-of-hand.
3. Foolishness or empty pretense used especially to disguise deception or chicanery.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Magical formula used in conjuring, 1630s, earlier Hocas Pocas, common name of a magician or juggler (1620s); a sham-Latin invocation used by jugglers, perhaps based on a perversion of the sacramental blessing from the Mass, Hoc est corpus meum “This is my body.” The first to make this speculation on its origin apparently was English prelate John Tillotson (1630-1694).

Word of the day

The word for today is…

harrumph (verb) – 1. To make a show of clearing one’s throat.
2. To offer usually brief critical comments.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Representing the sound of clearing the throat or a disapproving noise, 1918, imitative.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

gobsmacked (adj) – (Chiefly British Slang) Extremely surprised or shocked; astounded.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Also gob-smacked, “flabbergasted, amazed, astounded,” literally “smacked in the mouth,” by 1985, U.K. slang, from gob “mouth” + past participle of smack.

Word of the day

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gallimaufry (noun) – A jumble; a hodgepodge.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : “A medley, hash, hodge-podge,” 1550s, from French galimafrée “hash, ragout, dish made of odds and ends,” from Old French galimafree, calimafree “sauce made of mustard, ginger, and vinegar; a stew of carp” (14th century), which is of unknown origin. Perhaps from Old French galer “to make merry, live well” + Old North French mafrer “to eat much,” from Middle Dutch maffelen.”

Word of the day

The word for today is…

fete (noun) – 1. A festival or feast.
2. (a) An elaborate, often outdoor entertainment.
(b) An elaborate party.

(verb) – 1. To celebrate or honour with a festival, a feast, or an elaborate entertainment.
2. To pay honour to.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1754, from French fête “festival, feast,” from Old French feste “feast, celebration”. If the date is right, first used in English by Horace Walpole (1717-1797).

Word of the day

The word for today is…

feckless (adj) – 1. Careless and irresponsible.
2. Feeble or ineffective.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1590s, from feck, “effect, value, vigor” (late 15th century), Scottish shortened form of effect + -less. Popularised by Carlyle, who left its opposite, feckful, in dialectal obscurity.