Word of the Day

Word of the day

The word for today is…

forbearance (noun) – 1. Tolerance and restraint in the face of provocation; patience.
2. (Law) The act of giving a debtor more time to pay rather than immediately enforcing a debt that is due.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1570s, originally legal, in reference to enforcement of debt obligations, from forbear + -ance. General sense of “a refraining from” is from 1590s.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

cyclopean (adj) – 1. (often Cyclopean) Relating to or suggestive of a Cyclops.
2. Very big; huge.
3. Of or constituting a primitive style of masonry characterised by the use of massive stones of irregular shape and size.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : English cyclopean comes from the Latin adjective Cyclōpēus, a borrowing of Greek Kyklṓpeios, a derivative of the common noun, proper noun, and name Kýklōps, which the Greeks interpreted to mean “round eye” (a compound of kýklos “wheel” and ōps “eye, face”). The most famous Cyclops is Polyphemus, a crude, solitary shepherd living on an island whom Odysseus blinded in Homer’s Odyssey. Hesiod (ca. 8th century b.c.) in his Theogony names three Cyclopes; they are craftsmen who make Zeus’s thunderbolts, and whom the Greeks often credited with building the walls of ancient Mycenae, Tiryns, Argos, and the acropolis of Athens, all constructed with massive limestone blocks roughly fitted together without mortar. Cyclopean entered English in the 17th century.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

copse (noun) – A thicket of small trees or shrubs.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1570s, “small wood grown for purposes of periodic cutting,” contraction of coppice.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

coeval (adj) – Originating or existing during the same period; lasting through the same era.

(noun) – One of the same era or period; a contemporary.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Coeval comes to English from the Latin word coaevus, meaning “of the same age.” Coaevus was formed by combining the co- prefix (“in or to the same degree”) with Latin aevum (“age” or “lifetime”). The root aevum is also a base in such temporal words as longevity, medieval, and primeval. Although coeval can technically describe any two or more entities that coexist, it is most typically used to refer to things that have existed together for a very long time (such as galaxies) or that were concurrent with each other in the distant past (parallel historical periods of ancient civilizations, for example).

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

banshee (noun) – A female spirit in Gaelic folklore believed to presage, by wailing, a death in a family.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : In Irish folklore, a bean sídhe (literally “woman of fairyland”) was not a welcome guest. When she was seen combing her hair or heard wailing beneath a window, it was considered a sign that a family member was about to die. English speakers modified the mournful fairy’s Irish name into the modern word banshee—a term we now most often use to evoke her woeful or terrible or earsplitting cry, as in “to scream like a banshee,” or attributively, as in “a banshee wail.”

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

terpsichore (noun) – 1. (Greek Mythology) The Muse of dancing and choral singing.
2. The art of dancing.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : The muse of the dance, Greek Terpsikhore, literally “enjoyment of dance,” from terpein “to delight” (from PIE root *terp- “to satisfy;” source also of Sanskrit trpyati “takes one’s fill,” Lithuanian tarpstu, tarpti “to thrive, prosper”) + khoros “dance, chorus”.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

rapporteur (noun) – One who is designated to give a report, as at a meeting.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Circa 1500, from French rapporteur “tell-tale, gossip; reporter,” from rapporter.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

diphthong (noun) – A complex speech sound or glide that begins with one vowel and gradually changes to another vowel within the same syllable, as (oi) in boil or (ī) in fine.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : “A union of two vowels pronounced in one syllable,” late 15th century, diptonge, from Late Latin diphthongus, from Greek diphthongos “having two sounds,” from di- “double” (from PIE root *dwo- “two”) + phthongos “sound, voice,” which is related to phthengesthai “to utter a sound, sound, raise one’s voice, call, talk,” which Beekes reports as of “no certain etymology. None of the existing connections with semantically comparable words … is phonetically convincing.”

In uttering a proper diphthong both vowels are pronounced; the sound is not simple, but the two sounds are so blended as to be considered as forming one syllable, as in joy, noise, bound, out. An “improper” diphthong is not a diphthong at all, being merely a collocation of two or more vowels in the same syllable, of which only one is sounded, as ea in breach, eo in people, ai in rain, eau in beau. [Century Dictionary]

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

exigent (adj) – 1. Requiring immediate action; pressing.
2. Having or making urgent demands; demanding.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Exigent is a derivative of the Latin present participle of exigere, which means “to demand.” Since its appearance in Middle English, the law has demanded a lot from exigent. It first served as a noun for a writ issued to summon a defendant to appear in court or else be outlawed. The noun’s meaning was then extended to refer to other pressing or critical situations. Its adjectival sense followed and was called upon to testify that something was urgent and needed immediate aid or action. Nowadays, the adjective is seen frequently in legal contexts referring to “exigent circumstances,” such as those used to justify a search by police without a warrant.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

raffish (adj) – 1. Cheaply or showily vulgar in appearance or nature; tawdry.
2. Characterised by a carefree or fun-loving unconventionality; rakish.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Raffish is protean in its meanings and possible origins. Its meanings include “mildly, engagingly nonconformist, rakish; gaudy, vulgar, tawdry.” Raffish is obviously a derivative of the noun raff, but it is with raff that real problems arise. Raff means “rabble, the lower sort of people, riffraff.” Raff may be a shortening of riffraff (earlier riffe raffe), from Middle English rif and raf, a catchall phrase of very uncertain origin meaning “everything, every particle, things of slight value, everyone, one and all.”

Related phrases or idioms exist in other languages: Walloon French has rif-raf “fast and sloppy”; Middle Dutch has rijf ende raf “everything, everyone, one and all; Italian has di riffa o di raffa “one way or another.” Raffish entered English in the late 18th century.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.