Word of the Day

Word of the day

The word for today is…

rapprochement (noun) – 1. A reestablishing of cordial relations, as between two countries.
2. The state of reconciliation or of cordial relations.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : English rapprochement comes directly from modern French rapprochement “reconciliation, understanding,” dates only from the end of the 18th century, and is still unnaturalized, as one can tell from its more or less French pronunciation. The underlying French word is the verb approcher (Old French aprochier) “to approach,” which English adopted in the 14th century. The English spelling approach has given rise to two nonstandard spellings of rapprochement: rapproachement and rapproachment. Rapprochement entered English in the late 18th century.

Word of the day

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titanic (adj) – 1. Titanic Of or relating to the Titans.
2. (a) Having great stature or enormous strength; huge or colossal.
(b) Of enormous scope, power, or influence.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : “Gigantic, colossal,” 1709, from titan + -ic. The British passenger liner R.M.S. Titanic sank April 15, 1912, and the name became symbolic of the destruction of supposedly indestructible.

Word of the day

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polyhistor (noun) – A person with broad knowledge.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : “Very learned person,” 1580s, from Greek polyhistor “very learned,” from poly “much, many” (from PIE root *pele- “to fill”) + histor “knowing, learned”.

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stumblebum (noun) – 1. A person regarded as blundering or inept.
2. A punch-drunk or second-rate prizefighter.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : “alcoholic derelict,” 1932, from stumble + bum.

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peacock (noun) – 1. (a) A male peafowl, distinguished by its crested head, brilliant blue or green plumage, and long modified back feathers that are marked with iridescent eyelike spots and that can be spread in a fanlike form.
(b) A peafowl, either male or female.
2. A vain or ostentatious person.

(verb) – To strut about like a peacock; exhibit oneself vainly.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Circa 1300, poucock, from Middle English po “peacock” + coc.

Po is from Old English pawa “peafowl” (cock or hen), from Latin pavo (genitive pavonis), which, with Greek taos said to be ultimately from Tamil tokei (but perhaps is imitative; Latin represented the peacock’s sound as paupulo).

The Latin word also is the source of Old High German pfawo, German Pfau, Dutch pauw, Old Church Slavonic pavu. Used as the type of a vainglorious person from late 14th century. Its flesh superstitiously was believed to be incorruptible (even St. Augustine credits this). “When he sees his feet, he screams wildly, thinking that they are not in keeping with the rest of his body.”

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nocent (adj) – Causing injury; harmful.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Nocent derives from Latin nocent-, the stem of nocēns, present participle of nocēre “to harm.” The widespread Proto-Indo-European root nek-, nok- underlies Latin nocēre and its derivatives noxa, noxia “harm, injury,” and the adjective noxius “harmful, noxious.” From the variant nek- Latin derives nex (stem nec-) “death, violent death, murder,” the root of the adjectives internecīnus and perniciōsus “ruinous, deadly, pernicious.” From nek- Greek derives nekrós “corpse, dead body,” and the source of the first element of necromancy (communication with the dead), necrophilia (sexual attraction to a corpse), and nectar (Greek néktar), the (red) drink of the Olympian gods, literally “overcoming death.” Nocent entered English in the 15th century.

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netiquette (noun) – Etiquette practiced or advocated in electronic communication over a computer network.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Netiquette is a blend of the words network and etiquette. It came to English in the early 1980s.

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mummery (noun) – 1. A performance by mummers.
2. (a) Pretentious or hypocritical show or ceremony.
(b) An act or instance of this.

(A mummer is an actor in a traditional masked mime or a mummers’ play, or an actor in the theatre.)

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1520s, “performance of mumming,” from Old French mommerie, from momer. Transferred sense of “ridiculous ceremony or ritual” is from 1540s.

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moribund (adj) – 1. Approaching death; about to die.
2. On the verge of becoming obsolete.
3. Barely active or in use, especially after a period of intense activity.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : The Latin adjective moribundus “about to die, dying,” is a derivative of the Latin (and Proto-Indo-European) root mer- (and its variants) “to die,” appearing in Sanskrit marati “he dies,” Greek émorten “he died,” Baltic (Lithuanian) mir̃sti “to die,” and Hittite mert “he died.” Moribund entered English in the 18th century.

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mealy-mouthed (adj) – Unwilling to state facts or opinions simply and directly.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : The earliest written occurrence of a form of mealy-mouthed is mealmouth (1546); mealmouthed and mealy-mouthed (also mealymouthed) appear in 1570 and 1571, respectively. German has a similar expression about avoiding direct language, Mehl im Maule behalten “to keep meal in one’s mouth,” used by the Protestant Reformer Martin Luther (1483-1546).