Word of the Day

Word of the day

The word for today is…

furlong (noun) – A unit for measuring distance, equal to 1/8 mile (201 metres).

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Furlong is an English original and can be traced back to Old English furlang, a combination of the noun furh (“furrow”) and the adjective lang (“long”). Though now standardized as a length of 220 yards (or 1/8th of a mile), the furlong was originally defined less precisely as the length of a furrow in a cultivated field. This length was equal to the long side of an acre—an area originally defined as the amount of arable land that could be plowed by a yoke of oxen in a day, but later standardized as an area measuring 220 yards (one furlong) by 22 yards, and now defined as any area measuring 4,840 square yards. In contemporary usage, furlong is often encountered in references to horse racing.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

frenzy (noun) – 1. A state of violent mental agitation or wild excitement.
2. Temporary madness or delirium.
3. A mania; a craze.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Mid-14th century, “delirium, insanity,” from Old French frenesie “frenzy, madness” (13th century), from Medieval Latin phrenesia, from phrenesis, back-formation from Latin phreneticus “delirious”. Meaning “excited state of mind” is from c. 1400.

Word of the day

The special word for today is…

handsel (noun) – 1. A gift to express good wishes at the beginning of a new year or enterprise.
2. The first money or barter taken in, as by a new business or on the opening day of business, especially when considered a token of good luck.
3. (a) A first payment.
(b) A specimen or foretaste of what is to come.

(verb) – 1. To give a handsel to.
2. To launch with a ceremonial gesture or gift.
3. To do or use for the first time.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : According to an old custom in the British Isles, the first Monday of the New Year is Handsel Monday, a day to give a small gift or good luck charm to children or to those who have served you well. As long ago as the 13th century, English speakers were using the ancestor of handsel in the context of omens and luck, eventually leading to the meaning of a good luck charm given to one at the start of some new situation or condition. By the 18th century, traders were using handsel for the first cash they earned in the morning—to them, an omen of good things to follow. Nowadays, it can also be used for something that gives a taste of things to come.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

dopester (noun) – One who analyzes and forecasts future events, as in sports or politics.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : The dope at the heart of this Americanism refers to information, data, or news. This slang term dates to 1905–10.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

exculpate (verb) – To clear of guilt or blame.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : You need not take the blame if you’re unfamiliar with the origins of exculpate, and we would be glad to enlighten you, if that’s the case. The word, which was adopted in the 17th century from Medieval Latin exculpatus, traces back to the Latin noun culpa, meaning “blame.” Some other descendants of culpa in English include culpable (“meriting condemnation or blame”) and inculpate (“incriminate”), as well as the considerably rarer culpatory (“accusing”) and disculpate (a synonym of exculpate). You may also be familiar with the borrowed Latin phrase mea culpa, which translates directly as “through my fault” and is used in English to mean “a formal acknowledgment of personal fault or error.”

Word of the day

The word for today is…

diablerie (noun) – 1. Sorcery; witchcraft.
2. Representation of devils or demons, as in paintings or fiction.
3. Devilish conduct; deviltry.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : English diablerie is a borrowing from French diablerie “mischief,” from Old French diablerie, deablerie “an act inspired by the devil, sorcery.” French diable comes from Late Latin diabolus “the devil” (in the Vulgate and church fathers), from Greek diábolos “slanderer; enemy, Satan” (in the Septuagint), “the Devil” (in the Gospels). Diablerie entered English in the 17th century.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

chapel (noun) – 1. (a) A place of worship that is smaller than and subordinate to a church.
(b) A place of worship in an institution, such as a prison, college, or hospital.
(c) A recess or room in a church set apart for special or small services.
(d) A place of worship for those not belonging to an established church.
(e) The services held at a chapel:.
2. (Music) A choir or orchestra connected with a place of worship at a royal court.
3. (a) A funeral home.
(b) A room in a funeral home used for conducting funeral services.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Chapel is ultimately derived from the Late Latin word cappa, meaning “cloak.” How did we get from a garment to a building? The answer to this question has to do with a shrine created to hold the sacred cloak of St. Martin of Tours. In Medieval Latin, this shrine was called cappella (from a diminutive of cappa, meaning “short cloak or cape”) in reference to the relic it contained. Later, the meaning of cappella broadened to include any building that housed a sacred relic, and eventually to a place of worship. Anglo-French picked up the term as chapele, which in turn passed into English as chapel in the 13th century. In case you are wondering, the term a cappella, meaning “without instrumental accompaniment,” entered English from Italian, where it literally means “in chapel style.”

Word of the day

The word for today is…

anthropomorphise (US -ize) (form) – To ascribe human characteristics to things not human.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : “To invest with human qualities,” 1834. anthropomorphous + -ise or ize,
Etymology of anthropomorphous. “Having human form; anthropoid in form” (of apes, etc.), 1753, Englishing of Late Latin anthropomorphus “having human form,” from Greek anthropomorphos “of human form,” from anthropos “human being” + morphe “form,” a word of uncertain etymology.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

admonish (verb) – 1. (a) To counsel (another) against something to be avoided or warn (that something is dangerous).
(b) To urge or exhort (someone to do something).
(c) To remind (someone) of something forgotten or disregarded, as an obligation or a responsibility.

  1. To reprove gently but earnestly

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : We won’t admonish you if you don’t know the origins of today’s word—its current meanings have strayed slightly from its history. Admonish was borrowed in the 14th century (via Anglo-French amonester) from Vulgar Latin admonestāre, which itself is probably a derivative of admonestus, the past participle of the Latin verb admonēre, meaning “to warn.” Admonēre, in turn, was formed by the combination of the prefix ad- and monēre, “to warn.” Other descendants of monēre in English include monitor, monitory (“giving a warning”), premonition, and an archaic synonym of admonish, monish. Incidentally, admonish has a number of other synonyms as well, including reprove, rebuke, reprimand, reproach, and chide.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

pamphleteer (noun) – A writer of pamphlets or other short works taking a partisan stand on an issue.

(verb) – To write and publish pamphlets.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Pamphlets—unbound printed publications with no covers or with paper covers—are published about all kinds of subjects, but our word pamphlet traces back to one particular document. It derives from the title of a short Latin love poem of the 12th century: Pamphilus, seu De Amore, which can be translated as “Pamphilus, or On Love.” The name Pamphilus referred to a Greek god whose name means “loved by all.” Following from this, the original pamphlets were handwritten poems, tracts, or treatises, often consisting of several pages bound together. Pamphleteer, which can be both a noun and a verb, combines pamphlet with the -eer suffix found in such words as engineer and puppeteer.