Word of the Day

Word of the day

The word for today is…

valetudinarian (noun) – A sickly or weak person, especially one who is constantly and morbidly concerned with his or her health.

(adj) – 1. Chronically ailing; sickly.
2. Constantly and morbidly concerned with one’s health.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : “one who is constantly concerned with his own ailments,” 1703, from valetudinary (1580s), from Latin valetudinarius, from valetudo “state of health” (either good or bad), from valere “be strong” (from PIE root *wal- “to be strong”) + -tudo, abstract noun suffix. Valetudinary (adj.) “sickly” is recorded from 1580s.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, two cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

inscape (noun) – The essential, distinctive, and revelatory quality of a thing.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : It is likely that the English poet and Jesuit priest Gerard Manley Hopkins (1844-89) coined the noun inscape. The obsolete noun inshape (i.e., internal form or inward shape) was a probable model. Hopkins also coined sprung rhythm and instress (i.e., the force sustaining an inscape). Inscape entered English in 1868.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, two cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

grok (verb) – To understand profoundly through intuition or empathy.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Grok was coined by Robert A. Heinlein in the science-fiction novel Stranger in a Strange Land (1961).

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, two cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

grawlix (noun) – A series of special characters, such as “@#$%&*,” that are used to indicate either miscellaneous text, or more commonly, swear words.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Apparently coined by American cartoonist Mort Walker in 1980.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, two cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

kosher (adj) – 1. (Judaism) (a) Conforming to dietary laws; ritually pure.
(b) Observing dietary laws.
(c) Selling or serving food prepared in accordance with dietary laws.
2. (Informal) Legitimate; permissible

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Kosher is one of the most common words of Yiddish origin in American English. Yiddish kosher comes from Hebrew kosher (Ashkenazi pronunciation), from Hebrew kāshēr “right, fit, proper.” Kosher as an adjective “pertaining to foods prepared according to Jewish dietary law” dates from the mid-19th century; the sense “proper, legitimate” dates from the late 19th century. Kosher as a noun “kosher food, kosher store” dates from the late 19th century.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, two cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

frugivorous (adj) – Feeding on fruit; fruit-eating.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : The English adjective frugivorous “fruit-eating” is used mostly in biology to describe animals that eat fruit. The first element, frugi-, is a combining form of Latin frux “fruit, crops, produce” related to the verb fruī “to enjoy the fruits or products or results of.” From the form frūg- English has frugal and frugivorous.

From fructus, the past participle of fruī (from an assumed frūguī), English has fruit (from Old French, from Latin frūctus) and fructify (from Old French fructifier, from Latin frūctificāre). The second element, -vorous, ultimately comes from Latin vorāre “to swallow ravenously,” whence English has devour (from Middle French devourer, from Latin dēvorāre “to swallow down,” and voracious (from Latin vorāc-, the stem of vorax “ravenous, insatiable.”

Frugivorous entered English in the 18th century.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, two cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

feint (noun) – 1. (a) A military attack or manoeuvre that is meant to divert attention away from a planned point of attack.
(b) A body movement that is intended to divert another’s attention, often by being deliberately left uncompleted.
2. A deceptive action calculated to divert attention from one’s real purpose.

(verb) – 1. To deceive with a feint.
2. To do or perform as a feint.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : The English noun feint comes from Old French feinte, a noun use of the feminine past participle of the verb feindre “to feign, pretend, dissemble.” The Old French verb comes from Latin fingere “to shape, form, fashion,” the ultimate source of English faint, fiction, figment, and effigy.

Feint entered English in the 17th century.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, two cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

exploit (noun) – 1. An act or deed, especially a brilliant or heroic one.
2. (Computers) A program or system designed to take advantage of a particular error or security vulnerability in computers or networks.

(verb) – 1. To employ to the greatest possible advantage.
2. To make use of selfishly or unethically.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : (noun) Late 14th century, “outcome of an action,” from Old French esploit “a carrying out; achievement, result; gain, advantage” (12th century, Modern French exploit), a very common word, used in senses of “action, deed, profit, achievement,” from Latin explicitum “a thing settled, ended, or displayed,” noun use of neuter of explicitus, past participle of explicare “unfold, unroll, disentangle,” from ex “out” + plicare “to fold” (from PIE root *plek- “to plait”).

(verb) Circa 1400, espleiten, esploiten “to accomplish, achieve, fulfill,” from Old French esploitier, espleiter “carry out, perform, accomplish,” from esploit. The sense of “use selfishly” first recorded 1838, from a sense development in French perhaps from use of the word with reference to mines, etc.

Meaning “feat, achievement” is c. 1400. Sense evolution is from “unfolding” to “bringing out” to “having advantage” to “achievement.”

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, two cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

disrupt (verb) – 1. To throw into confusion or disorder.
2. To interrupt or impede the progress of.
3. To break apart or alter so as to prevent normal or expected functioning.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1650s, but rare before c. 1820, from Latin disruptus, past participle of disrumpere. Or perhaps a back-formation from disruption.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, two cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

crapulence (noun) – 1. Sickness caused by excessive eating or drinking.
2. Excessive indulgence; intemperance.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1650s, from Latin crapulentus “very drunk,” from crapula “excessive drinking”

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, two cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.