Word of the Day

Word of the day

The word for today is…

(A Sir David Attenborough special).

parthenogenesis (noun) – 1. A form of reproduction in which an unfertilized egg develops into a new individual, occurring commonly among insects and certain other arthropods.
2. The artificial activation of an unfertilized usually mammalian egg, resulting in an embryolike cell cluster from which stem cells can be harvested.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : “Reproduction without fertilization,” 1849, from Greek parthenos “virgin,” of unknown origin, + -genesis “birth, origin, creation.”

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

oratrix (noun) – A woman plaintiff, or complainant, in equity pleading.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Latin, feminine of orator

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

oblige (verb) – 1. To compel or require (someone) to do something, as by circumstance or legality.
2. To make indebted or grateful.
3. To do a service or favour for.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Oblige shares some similarities with its close relative obligate, but there are also differences. Oblige derives via Middle English and the Anglo-French obliger from Latin obligare (“to bind to”), a combination of ob- (“to or toward”) and ligare (“to bind”), whereas obligate descends directly from obligatus, the Latin past participle of obligare.

Both oblige and obligate are frequently used in their past participle forms to express a kind of legal or moral constraint. Obligated once meant “indebted for a service or favour,” but today it typically means “required to do something because the law requires it or because it is the right thing to do.” Obliged is now the preferred term for the sense that Southern author Flannery O’Connor used in a 1952 letter: “I would be much obliged if you would send me six copies.”

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

linish (verb) – (Crafts) To polish and smooth the surface of a material by grinding or sanding.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Blend of linen and finish.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

embosk (verb) – To hide or cover, esp with greenery.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : The verb embosk “to hide in bushes” doesn’t look quite as bogus as embiggen, but it’s not far off. The prefix em-, a form of en- used before labial consonants (p, b, m) as in embalm, embankment, and embark, is familiar enough. Bosk is the funny word. It first appears as a singular noun boske (and plural boskes) in the late 13th century, meaning bush, bushes, and is last recorded about 1400 in Cleanness (or Purity), a poem by an unknown author known as the Gawain Poet.

Bosk survives in British dialect but reentered standard English in the 19th century through the poetry of Sir Walter Scott and Alfred, Lord Tennyson. As rare as bosk is, its derivative embosk is even rarer. Embosk entered English in the late 20th century.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

cerulean (adj) – Azure; sky-blue.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Cerulean comes from the Latin word caeruleus, which means “dark blue” and is most likely from caelum, the Latin word for “sky.” An artist rendering a sky of blue in oils or watercolours might choose a tube of cerulean blue pigment. Birdwatchers in the eastern U.S. might look skyward and see a cerulean warbler (Dendroica cerulea). Cerulean is not the only colour name that’s closely associated with the sky. Azure (which ultimately comes from a Persian word for “lapis lazuli,” a rich blue stone) describes the color of a cloudless sky and can even be a noun meaning “the unclouded sky.”

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

capitulate (verb) – 1. To surrender under specified conditions.
2. To give up all resistance; acquiesce.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : The English verb capitulate is from the Late Latin capitulātus “drawn up or arranged in chapters or headings,” from the verb capitulāre “to arrange in chapters, summarise, stipulate (in a contract), agree.” Capitulāre is a derivative of the noun capitulum, one of whose meanings in Late Latin is “section of a law,” in the Corpus Juris Civilis of the emperor Justinian (483-565). Capitulate entered English in the 16th century.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

volatile (adj) – 1. (Chemistry) (a) Evaporating readily at normal temperatures and pressures.
(b) Capable of being readily vaporised.
2. (a) Tending to vary often or widely, as in price.
(b) Inconstant; fickle.
(c) Lighthearted; flighty.
(d) Ephemeral; fleeting.
3. Tending to violence; explosive.
4. Flying or capable of flying; volant.
5. (Computers) Of or relating to memory whose data is erased when the memory’s power is interrupted.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Volatile was originally for the birds—quite literally. Back in the 14th century, volatile was a noun that referred to birds (especially wild fowl) or other winged creatures, such as butterflies. That’s not as flighty as it sounds. Volatile traces back to the Latin verb volare, which means “to fly.” By the end of the 16th century, people were using volatile as an adjective for things that were so light they seemed ready to fly. The adjective was soon extended to vapors and gases, and by the early 17th century, volatile was being applied to individuals or things as prone to sudden change as some gaseous substances.

In recent years, volatile has landed in economic, political, and technical contexts far flown from its avian origins.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

thwart (verb) – 1. To prevent the occurrence, realisation, or attainment of.
2. To oppose and defeat the efforts, plans, or ambitions of (someone).

(noun) – 1. A seat across a boat on which a rower may sit.
2. A transverse strut in a canoe or other small boat.

(adj) – 1. Extending, lying, or passing across; transverse.
2. Eager to oppose, especially wrongly; perverse.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : (verb) “oppose, hinder,” mid-13th century, from thwart (adv).

(adv) Circa 1200, from a Scandinavian source, probably Old Norse þvert “across,” originally neuter of thverr “transverse, across,” cognate with Old English þweorh “transverse, perverse, angry, cross,” from Proto-Germanic *thwerh- “twisted, oblique” (source also of Middle Dutch dwers, Dutch dwars “cross-grained, contrary,” Old High German twerh, German quer, Gothic þwairhs “angry”), altered (by influence of *thwer- “to turn”) from *therkh-, from PIE root *terkw- “to twist.” From mid-13th century as an adjective.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

squamous (adj) – 1. Covered with or formed of scales; scaly.
2. Resembling a scale or scales; thin and flat like a scale.
3. Of or relating to the thin, platelike part of the temporal bone.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : The adjective squamous is a direct borrowing of Latin squāmōsus “covered with scales, scaly”, a derivative of the noun squāma “scale (on a fish or reptile), metal plate used in making armor.” The ultimate etymology of squāma is unclear, but it is related to squālēre “to be covered or crusted in scales or dirt,” and the derivatives of squālēre include squālidus “having a rough surface” and squālor “roughness, dirtiness, filth.” Squamous entered English in the 16th century.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.