Word of the Day

Word of the day

The word for today is…

almoner (noun) – 1. One who distributes alms.
2. (Chiefly British) A hospital social worker.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : “Official distributor of alms on behalf of another,” circa 1300 (mid-13th century as a surname), from Old French almosnier “alms-giver” (12th century; Modern French aumônier), from Vulgar Latin *almosinarius, from Late Latin elemosinarius “connected with alms,” from eleemosyna “alms” (see alms). OED notes, “the Renascence brought up a number of artificial spellings ….”

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

prologue (noun) – 1. An introduction or preface, especially a poem recited to introduce a play.
2. An introduction or introductory chapter, as to a novel.
3. An introductory act, event, or period.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Early 14th century, from Old French prologue (12th century) and directly from Latin prologus, from Greek prologos “preface to a play, speaker of a prologue,” literally “a speech beforehand,” from pro “before” + logos “discourse, speech,” from legein “to speak,” from PIE root *leg- “to collect, gather,” with derivatives meaning “to speak (to ‘pick out words’).”

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

pagan (noun) – 1. An adherent of a polytheistic religion in antiquity, especially when viewed in contrast to an adherent of a monotheistic religion.
2. A Neopagan.
3. (Offensive) (a) One who has no religion.
(b) An adherent of a religion other than Judaism, Christianity, or Islam.
4. A hedonist.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Late 14th century, from Late Latin paganus “pagan,” in classical Latin “villager, rustic; civilian, non-combatant” noun use of adjective meaning “of the country, of a village,” from pagus “country people; province, rural district,” originally “district limited by markers,” thus related to pangere “to fix, fasten,” from PIE root *pag- “to fasten.” As an adjective from early 15c.

Religious sense is often said to derive from conservative rural adherence to the old gods after the Christianisation of Roman towns and cities; but the word in this sense predates that period in Church history, and it is more likely derived from the use of paganus in Roman military jargon for “civilian, incompetent soldier,” which Christians (Tertullian, c.202; Augustine) picked up with the military imagery of the early Church (such as milites “soldier of Christ,” etc.). Applied to modern pantheists and nature-worshippers from 1908.

Pagan and heathen are primarily the same in meaning; but pagan is sometimes distinctively applied to those nations that, although worshiping false gods, are more cultivated, as the Greeks and Romans, and heathen to uncivilized idolaters, as the tribes of Africa. A Mohammedan is not counted a pagan much less a heathen.

The English surname Paine, Payne, etc., appears by old records to be from Latin paganus, but whether in the sense “villager,” “rustic,” or “heathen” is disputed. It also was a common Christian name in 13c., “and was, no doubt, given without any thought of its meaning” [“Dictionary of English Surnames”].

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

orthography (noun) – 1. The art or study of correct spelling according to established usage.
2. The aspect of language study concerned with letters and their sequences in words.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : “correct or proper spelling,” mid-15th century, ortographie, from Middle French orthographie (Old French ortografie, 13th century), from Latin orthographia, from Greek orthographia “correct writing,” from orthos “correct” + root of graphein “to write”.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

jeremiad (noun) – A literary work or speech expressing a bitter lament or a righteous prophecy of doom.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : A complaining tirade in a tone of grief or distress, 1780, from French jérémiade (1762), in reference to “Lamentations of Jeremiah” in the Old Testament.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

inveigh (verb) – To give vent to angry disapproval; protest vehemently.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Formerly also enveigh, late 15th century, “to introduce,” from Latin invehere “to bring in, carry in, introduce,” also “assault, assail,” from in- “against” + vehere “to carry” (from PIE root *wegh- “to go, move, transport in a vehicle”). Meaning “to give vent to violent denunciation” is from 1520s, from a secondary sense in Latin (see invective).

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

interlocutor (noun) – 1. Someone who takes part in a conversation, often formally or officially.
2. The performer in a minstrel show who is placed midway between the end men and engages in banter with them.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1510s, “one who speaks in a dialogue or conversation,” agent noun from Latin interlocut-, past participle stem of interloqui “speak between; interrupt,” from inter “between” + loqui “to speak” (from PIE root *tolkw- “to speak”).

In minstrel shows, the name of a straight-man character (1870) who was the questioner of the end men.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

gobbledygook (noun) – Unclear, wordy jargon.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Also gobbledegook, “the overinvolved, pompous talk of officialdom” [Klein], 1944, American English, first used by U.S. Rep. Maury Maverick, D.-Texas, (1895-1954), a grandson of the original maverick and chairman of U.S. Smaller War Plants Corporation during World War II, in a memo dated March 30, 1944, banning “gobbledygook language” and mock-threatening, “anyone using the words activation or implementation will be shot.” Maverick said he made up the word in imitation of turkey noise. Another word for it, coined about the same time, was bafflegab (1952).

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

entrepreneur (noun) – A person who organises, operates, and assumes the risk for a business venture.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1828, “manager or promoter of a theatrical production,” reborrowing of French entrepreneur “one who undertakes or manages,” agent noun from Old French entreprendre “undertake”. The word first crossed the Channel late 15th century (Middle English entreprenour) but did not stay. Meaning “business manager” is from 1852.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

depression (noun) – 1. (a) The act of depressing.
(b) The condition of being depressed.
2. An area that is sunk below its surroundings; a hollow.
3. The condition of feeling sad or despondent.
4. A mood disorder characterised by persistent sadness or inability to experience pleasure combined with other symptoms including poor concentration, indecisiveness, sleep problems, changes in appetite, and feelings of guilt, helplessness, and hopelessness. Also called clinical depression, major depressive disorder.
5. A lowering or reduction, as:
(a) A reduction in physiological vigor or activity.
(b)A lowering in amount, degree, or position.
6. (a) A period of drastic economic decline, characterised by decreasing aggregate output, falling prices, and rising unemployment.
(b) A period of widespread poverty and high unemployment.
(c) Depression See Great Depression.
7. Meteorology A region of low barometric pressure.
8. The angular distance below the horizontal plane through the point of observation.
9. (Astronomy) The angular distance of a celestial body below the horizon.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Late 14th century as a term in astronomy, from Old French depression (14th century) or directly from Latin depressionem (nominative depressio), noun of action from past participle stem of deprimere “to press down, depress”.

Attested from 1650s in the literal sense; meaning “dejection, depression of spirits” is from early 15th century (as a clinical term in psychology, from 1905); meteorological sense is from 1881 (in reference to barometric pressure); meaning “a lowering or reduction in economic activity” was in use by 1826; given a specific application (with capital D-) by 1934 to the one that began worldwide in 1929. For “melancholy, depression” an Old English word was grevoushede.

A melancholy leading to desperation, and known to theologians under the name of ‘acedia,’ was not uncommon in monasteries, and most of the recorded instances of medieval suicides in Catholicism were by monks.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.