Word of the Day

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pseud (noun) – (informal) A false, artificial, or pretentious person

(adj) – Another word for pseudo ( False or counterfeit; fake.)

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Pseud is a derogatory colloquialism derived by shortening from pseudointellectual. It dates from the mid-20th century.

Word of the Day

Word of the day

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stardust (noun) – 1. Charm or attractiveness that stems from celebrity and tends to forestall criticism.
2. A dreamlike, romantic, or uncritical sense of well-being.
3. (a). Dust formed in very hot gasses ejected from stellar atmospheres or in supernova explosions.
(b) A cluster of stars too distant to be seen individually, resembling a dimly luminous cloud of dust. Not in scientific use.
(c) Minute particles of matter that fall to Earth from the stars. Not in scientific use.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Also star-dust, 1836 in reference to irresolvable nebulas among star-fields in telescopic views; 1868 as “meteoric dust,” from star + dust.

Word of the Day

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suspiration (noun) – A long deep breath : sigh.

Source : merriam-webster

Etymology : English suspiration comes directly from Latin suspīrātiōn-, the stem of the noun suspīrātiō “a sigh,” a derivative of the verb suspīrāre “to fetch a deep breath, breathe out, exclaim with a sigh.” The combining form su- is a reduced form of the preposition and prefix sub “under, from under.” The Latin verb spīrāre “to breathe” is also the source of English spirit and sprite. Suspiration entered English in the 16th century.

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turncoat (noun) – One who traitorously switches allegiance.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology :
There are several possibilities for the origin of turncoat. One is that two English barons in the early 13th century changed fealty to King John (c1167–1216), literally changing their coats of arms from one lord to another. Another is that during the siege of Corfe Castle (1645) during the English Civil Wars (1642–51), Oliver Cromwell’s soldiers turned their coats inside out to match the colours of the Royalist army. A similar expression “to wear the King’s coat,” dating from the mid-19th century, means “serve in the King’s army.” The now obsolete idiom “to be in someone else’s coat,” dating from the mid-16th century, meant the modern “to be in someone else’s shoes.” Turncoat entered English in the 16th century.

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vatic (adj) – Of or characteristic of a prophet; oracular.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : The Latin noun vātis or vātēs “soothsayer, prophet, poet, bard” is probably a borrowing from a Celtic language (it has an exact correspondence in form and meaning with Old Irish fáith “seer, prophet,” from Proto-Celtic wātis). The Latin noun and Celtic root wāt- are from a Proto-Indo-European root meaning “to be spiritually aroused.” One of the Germanic forms of this root appears in the Old English adjective wōd “raging, crazy,” which survives in modern English in the adjective wood. Vatic entered English in the early 17th century.

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surreal (adj) – 1. Having qualities attributed to or associated with surrealism.
2. Having an oddly dreamlike quality.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1936, back-formation from surrealism or surrealist.

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senescent (adj) – 1. Growing old; aging.
2. No longer dividing. Used of a cell.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1650s, from Latin senescentem (nominative scenescens), present participle of senescere “to grow old,” from senex “old”.

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presbyopia (noun) – Inability of the eye to focus sharply on nearby objects, resulting from loss of elasticity of the crystalline lens with advancing age.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : “Far-sightedness brought on by age,” 1791, medical Latin, from Greek presbys “old man” + -opia, from ops “eye” (from PIE root *okw- “to see”).

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Word of the day

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milquetoast (noun) – One who has a meek, timid, unassertive nature.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : “Timid, meek person,” 1938, from Caspar Milquetoast, character created by U.S. newspaper cartoonist H.T. Webster (1885-1952) in the strip “The Timid Soul,” which ran from 1924 in the “New York World” and later the “Herald Tribune.” By 1930 the name was being referenced as a type of the meek man. The form seems to be milktoast with an added French twist.

Word of the Day

Word of the day

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inept (adj) – 1. Lacking or showing a lack of skill or competence; bungling or clumsy.
2. Showing a lack of judgment, sense, or reason; inappropriate or foolish.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Circa 1600, “not fit or suitable, inapt,” also “absurd, foolish,” from French inepte “incapable” (14th century) or directly from Latin ineptus “unsuitable, improper, impertinent; absurd, awkward, silly, tactless,” from in- “not, opposite of”+ aptus “apt”.

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