Zionism

Guest Post: Chris Trotter?s dark reading of Israel?s dilemma

Sheree Trotter

Guest Post: Sheree Trotter is Te Arawa. She is the co-founder of Shadows of Shoah and a Ph.D candidate at the University of Auckland. This article was first published 19/01/17 on Shalom Kiwi

 

 


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Facebook says it is OK to call someone a “stinking lousy Jew”

Facebook has become evil. They are allowing anti-semitic comments that attack people.

Tiffany Gabbay writes at Truth Revolt:

A months ago I posted to my public Facebook page?a brief blog?I’d written on the wave of stabbings, slashings and car rampages (known in Israel as?the Silent Intifada, or Knife Intifada) currently?tearing through Israel.

Soon after?a Facebook user who, from what I could tell, seemed to be affiliated with the far-right Hungarian group?Jobbik, replied with an illiterate and?anti-Semitic comment: “shut up stinking?lousy jew.”

For a split second, after reading the?comment, I was taken aback: this is what my father –?who fled Islamic persecution in Baghdad and later fought in Israel’s War of Independence — had?warned me about?my entire life. This is why he forever cautioned against letting strangers know who we?really were:?Jews.

My father?immigrated to the United States precisely to escape this kind of bigotry in all its greater and lesser incarnations,?and moreover, to ensure that his children would never fall victim to it.?Whether?a?seemingly?”harmless”?anti-Semitic slur,?or as?deadly as an Arab army, he had good cause to be leery.

I never thought myself naive.?I know anti-Semites exist. I write about them all the time. I grew up hearing stories of how my father and his family staved off an angry Islamic mob that tried to burn them down in their home?during the?Farhud; of?how he’d experienced?atrocities during the 1948 War that don’t bear repeating here, for their horrifically graphic nature. How could I be surprised by the?single?comment of a deranged person hiding behind a computer screen? ?? Read more »

So what is Zionism and why has the UN censored an exhibit about it?

Zionism is about indigenous people’s desire to return to their country of origin. Specifically Jewish people.

Imagine that most of us were thrown out of New Zealand after a war and our land, houses and businesses were all taken over by Australians rendering us all nationless. Imagine the loss of our identity as a nation and how that would feel. Now imagine that the name of our country was changed to reflect the new occupiers and New Zealand was claimed as part of the State of New South Wales and Australian territory. Would our desire to come back generations later be racist? If our return made us the majority again would our desire to rename our country New Zealand be racist? Unbelievably the UN has decided that Zionism is racism and have censored an exhibit about it.They even have deemed the displays about Israeli Arabs and?Jerusalem to be ‘inappropriate’. With this in mind I have included a couple of examples of these allegedly inappropriate displays so that you can form your own conclusions.

History is a strange thing considering that it was the UN who gave Israel back to the Jewish people in the first place! If that isn’t supporting Zionism I don’t know what is.

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Face of the day

 

Mayim Bialik

Actress Mayim Bialik told Facebook users that if her Zionism causes them not to want to follow her on social media, ?By all means don?t.? PHOTO- kveller.com

Actress Mayim Bialik told Facebook users that if her Zionism causes them not to want to follow her on social media, ?By all means don?t.?

Jewish actress Mayim Bialik took to Facebook…to condemn those boycotting?her on social media due to?her pro-Israel beliefs.

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Face of the day

Chloe Valdary. Photo: Canada Israel Friendship Association

Chloe Valdary. Photo: Canada Israel Friendship Association

Today’s face of the day is Chloe Valdary who is a consultant for the Committee for Accuracy in Middle East Reporting in America and a fellow at the Lawfare Project. I came across a hard hitting article she wrote about the student organisation SLP ( Students for Justice in Palestine ) and I just had to share it with you all.

The student organization Students for Justice in Palestine (SJP) is prominent on many college campuses, preaching a mantra of ?Freeing Palestine.? It masquerades as though it were a civil rights group when it is not. Indeed, as an African-American, I am highly insulted that my people?s legacy is being pilfered for such a repugnant agenda. It is thus high time to expose its agenda and lay bare some of the fallacies they peddle.

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Israeli elections are harder to pick than a broken nose

Many pundits are making all sorts of extreme picks for Israel’s elections.

Their electoral system is difficult to come to grips with, but we must remove personality and politics and just look at the numbers.

FiveThirtyEight has provided perhaps the best assessment so far of the state of play in the Israeli elections.

There are two phases to the Israeli election that starts Tuesday. The first: electing some politicians. That?s the relatively easy part to forecast. The second: Figuring out who?s going to govern with whom.

That is what?s really hard to predict.

In the first phase, no party is likely to win a majority of the 120 seats in the Knesset, the country?s parliament. But the two main parties are still jostling to hold the most seats. Likud, the party of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, is in a tight race for the most seats against the Zionist Union, the center-left leading opposition party.

Based on a local regression of polls since January, it looks like the Zionist Union will win the most seats: about 25, to Likud?s 22. In the following table, we?ve placed confidence intervals around the individual party estimates1 based on poll performance in the prior two elections.

bialik-enten-datalab-israeli-elections-table1

Predicting the voting may be the easier part, but it?s not easy. This year, Israeli law restricted polling as of the Thursday before the election, and no pollster could release results of new polls after Friday. That leaves any shifts in public opinion that occurs over the weekend in pollsters? blind spot, especially because some parties and candidates save big ammunition for the final days before balloting. Just before the 2013 election, a video emerged in which a candidate for Bayit Yehudi, a right-wing religious party whose name means Jewish Home, speaks about the prospect of the mosque on Jerusalem?s Temple Mount being blown up. (Some people interpreted the remarks as support for the idea.) The resulting furor over what the candidate called a joke cost the party seats ? including that candidate?s.

The major potentially vote-shifting news Monday was Netanyahu?s pledge to oppose establishment of a Palestinian state.

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Face of the day

cropped-elisabeth-HEADER

Todays face of the day, Elisabeth Sabaditsch-Wolff was found guilty of hate speech. Her crime? Calling Mohammed a pedophile and telling the truth about Islam. In Austria calls for killing Jews are legal but calling Mohammed a Pedophile is illegal.

The last time I checked, a man who sexually touches a 6 year old girl is a pedophile and one who has sex with a 9 year old girl is a pedophile. You can argue that back in the dark ages that kind of child sex was socially acceptable. I would argue that in modern, civilised times it is not. So therefore I confidently and loudly say that the founder of Islam by today’s civilised standards was a kiddy fiddler, a pedophile, a pedo, a pervert, a rapist, a creeper, a pedobear and? a child molester. The forced child marriage that is still sanctioned and happening within Islam is an abomination and is morally and ethically repulsive.

There I have said it. Charge me with hate speech for stating the obvious. What on earth is our world coming to when a woman cannot tell the truth without being arrested and dragged through the legal system while those who call for Jews to be killed not only are left alone, their words are justified by the judiciary.

February 12, 2015 by Daniel Greenfield

It?s not anti-Semitism. It?s anti-Zionism. You can tell because it involves Hitler and killing Jews.

Facebook postings from a Turkish man showing Adolf Hitler, with a statement praising the death of Jews, are a legitimate expression of criticizing the Jewish state, the spokesman for the prosecutor office in the city of Linz, Philip Christl, said on Tuesday.

?I could have annihilated all the Jews in the world, but I left some of them alive so you will know why I was killing them?,? Ibrahim B. wrote on his Facebook page in December.

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Matti Friedman on the Media?s Obsession with Israel

This speech by Matti Friedman, a journalist, explains much about the manipulation by media organisations against Israel.

It is being liberally published and has appeared at Honest Reporting and Quadrant Online.

I doubt it will get published in any mainstream media here, so I will.

Read it and understand how you are being manipulated, particularly over issues concerning Israel. It is quite long but very revealing.

One night several years ago, I came out of Bethlehem after a reporting assignment and?crossed through the Israeli military checkpoint between that city and its neighbor,?Jerusalem, where I live. With me were perhaps a dozen Palestinian men, mostly in their?thirties ? my age. No soldiers were visible at the entrance to the checkpoint, a?precaution against suicide bombers. We saw only steel and concrete. I followed the?other men through a metal detector into a stark corridor and followed instructions?barked from a loudspeaker ? Remove your belt! Lift up your shirt! The voice belonged to?a soldier watching us on a closed-circuit camera. Exiting the checkpoint, adjusting my?belt and clothing with the others, I felt like a being less than entirely human and?understood, not for the first time, how a feeling like that would provoke someone to?violence.

Consumers of news will recognize this scene as belonging to the Israeli occupation of the?West Bank, which keeps the 2.5 million Palestinians in that territory under military rule,?and has since 1967. The facts of this situation aren?t much in question. This should be an?issue of concern to Israelis, whose democracy, military, and society are corroded by the?inequality in the West Bank. This, too, isn?t much in question.

The question we must ask, as observers of the world, is why this conflict has come over?time to draw more attention than any other, and why it is presented as it is. How have?the doings in a country that constitutes 0.01 percent of the world?s surface become the?focus of angst, loathing, and condemnation more than any other? We must ask how?Israelis and Palestinians have become the stylized symbol of conflict, of strong and?weak, the parallel bars upon which the intellectual Olympians of the West perform their?tricks ? not Turks and Kurds, not Han Chinese and Tibetans, not British soldiers and?Iraqi Muslims, not Iraqi Muslims and Iraqi Christians, not Saudi sheikhs and Saudi?women, not Indians and Kashmiris, not drug cartel thugs and Mexican villagers.

Questioning why this is the case is in no way an attempt to evade or obscure reality, which is why I opened with the checkpoint leading from Bethlehem. On the contrary ? anyone seeking a full understanding of reality can?t avoid this question. My experiences as a journalist provide part of the answer, and also raise pressing questions that go beyond the practice of journalism.

I have been writing from and about Israel for most of the past 20 years, since I moved?there from Toronto at age 17. During the five and a half years I spent as part of the?international press corps as a reporter for the American news agency The Associated?Press, between 2006 and 2011, I gradually began to be aware of certain malfunctions in?the coverage of the Israel story ? recurring omissions, recurring inflations, decisions?made according to considerations that were not journalistic but political, all in the?context of a story staffed and reported more than any other international story on earth.?When I worked in the AP?s Jerusalem bureau, the Israel story was covered by more AP?news staff than China, or India, or all of the fifty-odd countries of sub-Saharan Africa?combined.

This is representative of the industry as a whole. ? ? ? Read more »

An insiders guide to reporting on Israel/Gaza conflict

Journalists over looking Gaza from Sderot   Photo/ Cam Slater, Whaleoil Media

Journalists over looking Gaza from Sderot Photo/ Cam Slater, Whaleoil Media

Tablet has an essay about the media manipulations in reporting the Israel/Gaza conflict.

It is by ?Matti Friedman who is?a?former AP correspondent who explains how and why reporters get Israel so wrong, and why it matters. What she writes echoes what I saw in Israel.

The lasting importance of this summer?s war, I believe, doesn?t lie in the war itself. It lies instead in the way the war has been described and responded to abroad, and the way this has laid bare the resurgence of an old, twisted pattern of thought and its migration from the margins to the mainstream of Western discourse?namely, a hostile obsession with Jews. The key to understanding this resurgence is not to be found among jihadi webmasters, basement conspiracy theorists, or radical activists. It is instead to be found first among the educated and respectable people who populate the international news industry; decent people, many of them, and some of them my former colleagues.

While global mania about Israeli actions has come to be taken for granted, it is actually the result of decisions made by individual human beings in positions of responsibility?in this case, journalists and editors. The world is not responding to events in this country, but rather to the description of these events by news organizations. The key to understanding the strange nature of the response is thus to be found in the practice of journalism, and specifically in a severe malfunction that is occurring in that profession?my profession?here in Israel.

She looks at the disproportionate staffing and reporting on Israel compared with other countries.

Staffing is the best measure of the importance of a story to a particular news organization. When I was a correspondent at the AP, the agency had more than 40 staffers covering Israel and the Palestinian territories. That was significantly more news staff than the AP had in China, Russia, or India, or in all of the 50 countries of sub-Saharan Africa combined. It was higher than the total number of news-gathering employees in all the countries where the uprisings of the ?Arab Spring? eventually erupted.

To offer a sense of scale: Before the outbreak of the civil war in Syria, the permanent AP presence in that country consisted of a single regime-approved stringer. The AP?s editors believed, that is, that Syria?s importance was less than one-40th that of Israel. I don?t mean to pick on the AP?the agency is wholly average, which makes it useful as an example. The big players in the news business practice groupthink, and these staffing arrangements were reflected across the herd. Staffing levels in Israel have decreased somewhat since the Arab uprisings began, but remain high. And when Israel flares up, as it did this summer, reporters are often moved from deadlier conflicts. Israel still trumps nearly everything else.

The volume of press coverage that results, even when little is going on, gives this conflict a prominence compared to which its actual human toll is absurdly small. In all of 2013, for example, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict claimed 42 lives?that is, roughly the monthly homicide rate in the city of Chicago. Jerusalem, internationally renowned as a city of conflict, had slightly fewer violent deaths per capita last year than Portland, Ore., one of America?s safer cities. In contrast, in three years the Syrian conflict has claimed an estimated 190,000 lives, or about 70,000 more than the number of people who have ever died in the Arab-Israeli conflict since it began a century ago.

News organizations have nonetheless decided that this conflict is more important than, for example, the more than 1,600 women?murdered in Pakistan last year?(271 after being raped and 193 of them burned alive), the ongoing?erasure of Tibet?by the Chinese Communist Party, the?carnage in Congo?(more than 5 million dead as of 2012) or the?Central African Republic, and the drug wars in Mexico (death toll between 2006 and 2012:?60,000), let alone conflicts no one has ever heard of in obscure corners of?India?or?Thailand. They believe Israel to be the most important story on earth, or very close.

That is an indictment in itself right there. That is a massive news imbalance. ?? Read more »

Jon Voight takes on F.A.G.

Embed from Getty Images

Jon Voight is standing up to the Hollywood luvvies who have signed an letter denouncing Israel.

He tells a few home truths…I wonder if his daughter, Angelina Jolie, will take pause to read what her father has written.

From Hollywood Reporter:

My name is?Jon Voight?and I am more than angry, I am heartsick that people like?Penelope Cruz?and?Javier Bardem?could incite anti-Semitism all over the world and are oblivious to the damage they have caused.

They are obviously ignorant of the whole story of Israel?s birth, when in 1948 the Jewish people were offered by the UN a portion of the land originally set aside for them in 1921, and the Arab Palestinians were offered the other half. The Arabs rejected the offer, and the Jews accepted, only to be attacked by five surrounding Arab countries committed to driving them into the sea. But the Israelis won. The Arabs tried it again in 1967, and again in 1973, launching a sneak attack on the holiest Jewish holiday. Each time the Jews prevailed but not without great loss of life.? And when Israel was not fighting a major war, it was defending itself against terrorist campaigns. ? Read more »