Zoology

Good for whales, bad for Labour

Mike Williams, affectionately known as "Fat Tony"

Mike Williams, affectionately known as “Fat Tony”

Apparently, some Labour sources tell me that there was a lazy hundred grand offered to Labour prior to the election.

Tim Barnett failed to pick it up when Mike ‘Fat Tony’ Williams jacked it up doesn’t need to go on the whales.

With Labour getting 98% of their 2011 vote a spare hundy might have helped out.

Fat Tony apparently got the shits with Tim for not turning up when the meeting was organised for the cheque collection and so the donor decided to give the money to saving the whales.

Which on the face of it looks like a more sensible investment.

The number of blue whales in the northeastern Pacific appears to have returned to near-historic levels thanks to a 48-year international ban on commercial or subsistence whaling for this species and allied laws enacted at national levels.

The current population of blue whales off the US West Coast is about 2,200, or 97 percent of their levels at the beginning of the 20th century, according to a study published Friday in the journal Marine Mammal Science.   Read more »

Photo Of The Day

Photo via Leandra Vissr’s Facebook page Unidentified Creature Found On Beach

Photo via Leandra Vissr’s Facebook page
Unidentified Creature Found On Beach

Odd Sea Creature Puzzles South Africa Experts

Read more »

Dressed in black, bloated with gas & stinks

_74525457_nfwhale1

Did Kim Dotcom die and wash ashore in Canada?

But I digress. Actually three rotting whale carcasses need disposing of and the Canadians are stuck in a bit of a conundrum as to how to get rid of them.

One man’s trash may be another man’s treasure, but a community leader says the hassle of dealing with rotting blue whales on Newfoundland’s west coast is a bigger problem than people may realize.

Two blue whale carcasses washed ashore on the coast of Rocky Harbour and Trout River, both located near Gros Morne National Park. A sperm whale carcass also washed ashore in the Cape St. George area.

The animals died after getting caught in severe ice conditions off the island’s coast this winter.

Maurice Budgell, chair of the King’s Point Heritage Society, which operates the town’s Whale Pavilion, said when his community took on the task of getting the flesh off a humpback whale carcass, it was a bigger job than anyone bargained for, and they’re not interested in doing it again.

“With all of the problems that we had with the one that we have here now, it would be a monstrous job to take on something else like that,” said Budgell.   Read more »

Photo Of The Day

Photograph by Paul Nicklen

Photograph by Paul Nicklen

Deadly Leopard Seal

 

Read more »

How are the Polar Bears and Whales doing?

The green taliban like to scare us that Whales and Polar Bears are dying…but are they?

Nope…not anytime soon.

Humpback whales. Some cetaceans are in big trouble. The Yangtze River dolphin is down to a few individuals, at best. Right whales could disappear by the end of the century. Yet we’ve been repeating the “save the whales” mantra for so long that the real conservation status of most whales is widely misunderstood.

Humpbacks were endangered decades ago due to whaling, but international protection has helped them rebound so well that they are now listed as a “species of least concern.” The global pre-whaling population is estimated at about 125,000, and today they probably number about 80,000 individuals. Conservation efforts worked, and humpback whales are doing all right now.  Read more »

The 52 hertz whale

This could is the whale song of what is possibly the world’s loneliest whale:

Since the 1980s, scientists have heard a single whale in the Pacific, singing at a higher frequency than any other—way up at 52 hertz, rather than down below human hearing at 15-20 hertz where blue and fin whales normally sing. In spite of listening in for two decades, no one has ever heard a lady whale reply.   Read more »

Don’t mess with Whales

Seriously I don’t know why people mess around with Whales…it always ends in tears.

cm-whale-tw-20130707124919496641-620x349

A whale has knocked out a surfer in a bizarre incident at Bondi Beach.

The 15 metre humpback whale surfaced among surfboard riders and swimmers close to the beach this morning, the Sydney Morning Herald reported.   Read more »

Penguins doing fine despite Global Warming

Global warming was supposed to see the end of penguins amongst other things.

In 2009 the following prediction was made in Australia:

MARK COLVIN: Scientists monitoring Australia’s most famous population of Little Penguins have had a scare, after some chicks died of starvation because their parents had to go farther afield than usual to find food.

Phillip Island’s nightly parade of the penguins is a major tourist attraction.

A biologist who works with the colony says it’s a problem which could become more common as climate change takes hold.

Four years on you’d expect that the poor wee things would be in dire straights. Turns out no.

The little penguins of Phillip Island are experiencing a baby boom.

Last summer’s breeding season was the best in a generation, a dramatic turnaround from the 1990s when either foxes were snatching the flightless birds or they were starving to death.

Research manager of the Phillip Island Nature Parks Dr Peter Dann says the rise in population is “about food”.

“These chicks are fatter, they’ve grown faster, the parents have brought back more food. The parents have been heavier than normal right through the breading seasons,” he said.

Dr Dann says it is a far cry from the 1990s, when food was scarce.

“It was even worse in 1995, when the main food they were eating during that breeding time was pilchard, and the pilchard had a huge die-off right across southern Australia to New Zealand,” he said.

“A lot of birds were actually dying of starvation and they bred very late.

One of the curious things about all this is that when Australia’s warmer, particularly in Autumn, penguins start breeding earlier in the following Spring and they breed much better than when Bass Strait’s cooler in Autumn.

Once again the alarmist media, complicit scientists and gullible fools are wrong.

Saving the Rhino by farming it

Rhino are endangered, and they are being killed in increasing numbers for their horns. Kevin Charles Redman suggests that we farm them instead and thus save them.

This has also been proposed for saving NZ native birds…putting them on the menu and thus saving them in the process.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Like the dodo, the dinosaur, and the pig-footed bandicoot (maybe), thewestern black rhinoceros is now a thing of the past, hunted to extinction for its horn. And small wonder. Despite being banned in 1977, the rhino horn trade is flourishing. Twenty years ago, a kilo of horn went for $4,700. Today, it sells for $65,000, making it more valuable than either gold or cocaine. Poaching is on the rise, and by some accounts, the number of endangered (but not yet extinct) white rhino killed doubles each year. By 2035, African wildlands could be devoid of the animal.  Read more »

Helping raise the IQ of Labour voters

A scientist is looking for a woman to carry a Neanderthal baby to term:

A leading geneticist is on the hunt for an ‘adventurous woman’ to help turn back the hands of time – and give birth to a Neanderthal baby.

George Church, a genetics professor at Harvard Medical School, believes he can bring back the extinct ancestor of modern man after more than 33,000 years.  Read more »